Audio issues for editing to think about.

5 replies [Last post]
Nintembo
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Joined: Jun 22 2004

Hello,

I have a 30 minute docu-drama I am in need of editing. I hope to have it put on a DVD alongside other shorts looking at the theme, of the Berlin Wall.

I have found a suite which is very close to me and it has the following audio system:

"Full 5.1 suite using Soundscape and Cubase with a Fostex 24 track tied in through a Mackie DXB 72 channel console"

I am not too bothered about a 5.1 edit to be honest.

However there needs to be a lot of voice over work completed. Is this system suitable for audio mixing and a final mix? Obviously I need to find out whether the mic would be suitable, but is the actual equipment good to start with?

Thanks,

Nin

Rob James
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Joined: Jun 26 2001

Hi Nin,

You really don't need this stuff any more. It's old technology. However, I am unclear as to whether you are considering buying equipment/software or hiring a facility. If the later, then it's fine.

If buying, I wouldn't bother. All you need these days is a decent mic and a decent mic pre to record and some half-way decent DAW software to edit and mix.

Rob The picture is only there to keep the sound in sync

paulears
paulears's picture
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Joined: Jul 8 2008

That's a bit unfair. Cubase is not old technology at all, my recent expensive update to the latest version proves that one. 24 track hardware multitrack is also still very much current - especially for live recording. I use an Alesis 24T HD machine and then edit within Cubase.

I quite agree that for many things, 100% software systems work quickest. In the edit suite, very little requires Cubase or multitrack - we're dealing with a much smaller track count. Sony Soundforge, Audition etc are all much simpler to use - but on track intensive projects other methods are better. A beautiful mic and quality pre-amp are all that's needed to get audio into the system - BUT what about the acoustics of the recording space. A studio with a pedigree of multi-track recording as this one appears to have suggests (not proves, of course) that they have a decent recording environment.

I'm assuming from the post that you are going to use a facility near you that has this kit? If so, seems a good idea to me. My own studio does very little music recording now, used mainly for recording drums that get taken away as files to edit somewhere else.

Rob James
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Joined: Jun 26 2001

Paul, I agree with a lot of what you say. My previous reply was a bit lazy. Certainly you need a good acoustic environment both to record and mix. Also a hardware multi-track can sometimes be useful for live recording. However, a lot of people are now using Pyramix and similar for live recordings of 64 tracks or more. But we are not talking about live recordings here apart from a narrator. In any case, that console and that recorder are old technology. Cubase would not be many people's first choice for post. Nuendo maybe, but Pro Tools (Yeuch!) Samplitude or Pyramix are much more common. Soundscape, although a good DAW in it's day is to be avoided simply on grounds of audio quality. The processing is fixed point and the headroom non-existent. SSL (new owners of Sydec) have been promising an update to address this. A highly skilled operator can work around the limitations but it isn't easy.

These days, even on feature film mixes, the hardware console has largely been relegated to the role of summing mixer, router and monitor control.

So, to spell it out, the kit mentioned is relatively outdated. I wouldn't buy it and I would be asking myself why it hasn't been updated if contemplating hiring a studio so equipped.

Rob The picture is only there to keep the sound in sync

fuddam
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Joined: Nov 19 2005

vegassssssssssssssssss

:D

Rob James
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Joined: Jun 26 2001

Indeed, most remiss of me not to mention Vegas in the DAW context.

Rob The picture is only there to keep the sound in sync