BBC decide not to film London Olympics in HD

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StevenBagley
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According to the Garuniad's website they are planning to cover bits of it in NHK's SuperHiVision for display in cities around the UK... :)

See http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2008/mar/11/television.bbc

Steven

Alan Roberts
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That doesn't mean they won't be covering the bulk of the Games in HD, only that they'll be providing stadium feeds in SuperHD. By 2012, we'll be past analogue switchoff, and 2 years past the "all programmes in HD" date. Plus, the international broadcasters will be demanding HD coverage anyway. What the Gaurdian's said is that NHK/BBC are working on closed circuit SuperHD, for which there's no broadcast means, and precious little recording/editing available even by then. They're describing research programmes, in the same way that we were covering Wimbledon in 1080 HD in 1990, closed circuit tv.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.

infocus
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By then I'm sure HD will be the norm, but what will be interesting is how UHD experimental broadcasts will square up against 3D experiments - the BBC did their first live 3D broadcast from the Rugby last week. Given a choice, which will be found the most impressive?

Or maybe 3D UHD will be the thing to experiment with by 2012? :)

Dave R Smith
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Alan Roberts wrote:
... and 2 years past the "all programmes in HD" date.

Can you clarify what you mean please Alan.
Are you saying BBC (or Sky?) has an objective for all TV transmissions to be HD by 2010?

Alan Roberts
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BBC, several years ago, made a prediction (that has subsequently become a directive) that all BBC production will be HD by 2010. In the original context, it came out more as an observation than a prediction, based on the then current rate of increase of HD production. But events have snowballed somewhat, and the industry now regards it as inevitable. That's why we're seeing so much originated in HD.

Shortly after that original "prediction", Sky started ramping up HD operations, and has driven the market. Now BBC and Channel 4 are broadcasting HD, and Freesat (launching soon) will carry those channels as well as the Freeview system. So, HD material is badly needed. Plus, international sales insist on HD these days.

So, the current objective (which will not be met) is for all production fro BBC to be HD by 2010. That does not mean all broadcast will be HD by then, only that production is going that way. And I expect rather less than 50% production to be HD by then at the present rate of growth.

The BBC currently has only one HD channel on air, and at present has no plan for any more. I suspect that will change in a year or so though, if ITV goes HD (which doesn't seem on the cards at present, due to their money problems, but just might if they get themselves sorted out).

Sky will put out as much HD as they can get customers for. At present, their growth is at the HD end, while Freeview is almost saturated, so the only way to attact more customers is to offer more, i.e. HD.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.

Dave R Smith
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Joined: May 10 2005

Thank-you for your informed and detailed reply Alan.
To-date HD is rarely on the requirements list for my clients.
(Actualy w/s is also rarely detailed as a requirement).
If.. sorry.. when HD becomes the norm for the TV viewing public, then I see HD delivery for smaller productions becoming the norm - or else the content may be perceived as sub-standard - so still a few years off.
Unless of course the Blu-Ray format win, along with games console quality drives the consumer demand for higher quality/resolution.
Will there be large-scale viewer demand for HD before/after during 2010?
Dunno - but it's not there yet and must be getting closer.

stuart621
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Dave R Smith wrote:
(Actualy w/s is also rarely detailed as a requirement).

Scary! Is that because few of your clients have widescreen sets or are they all happy with "stretchyvision'?

Dave R Smith
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Joined: May 10 2005
stuart621 wrote:
Scary! Is that because few of your clients have widescreen sets or are they all happy with "stretchyvision'?

I'll re-phrase that:
'My clients don't usually mention whether they want 4:3 or 16:9.'
I assume these days it's w/s.
My typical clients are corporate and sport sector, going to DVD market.

Don't forget pc's happily play either without stretching and most offices have 4:3 pc monitors, which may be used for viewing training media, so the format is not always obvious.

I discuss the merits of different formats with clients, but the point I wanted to make is that the client is typically re-active not pro-active in stating format needs.

stuart621
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Joined: Oct 24 2001

ah, I see. I would have been surprised to hear that most people ask for 4:3.

Lusky
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John Paul

infocus
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It's worth saying again that if both 4:3 and 16:9 versions may be required, it's much better in principle to derive 4:3 from 16:9 than the other way round. (Assuming in each case that you cut off a section of the original to form the derived version.)

Going 16:9 to 4:3 means taking the central 3/4 of the 720 horizontal pixels (540) and resizing them back out to 720 line by line. At first sight, 4:3 to 16:9 might seem comparable, take the central 3/4 of 576 vertically and resize them back to 576 column by column. But interlace considerations make this a lot less desirable in practice.

Alan Hodkinson
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stuart621 wrote:
Scary! Is that because few of your clients have widescreen sets or are they all happy with "stretchyvision'?

Stretchyvision.........Love it LOL

Alan Hodkinson at Viking Video