Channel 38

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steve5
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Joined: May 20 2006

Hi All

Will Band E Channel 38, as in the Sennheiser EW100 G3 system need a licence to operate , if so how much does it cost.
Cheers Steve

Wisz
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Joined: Jan 30 2001

Yes you will need a licence.

Further information can be found here:

http://www.jfmg.co.uk/index.htm

Richard Wisz Media Services

John Willett
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steve5 wrote:
Hi All

Will Band E Channel 38, as in the Sennheiser EW100 G3 system need a licence to operate , if so how much does it cost.
Cheers Steve

Yes, you will need a licence - the same as you did for Ch.69.

A current Ch.69 licence also covers Ch.38 / 39 / 40 - though Ch. 39 / 40 will be withdrawn when Ch.38 becomes country-wide, and Ch.69 will be withdrawn at the end of next year.

JFMG have all the details - the old price was £75 p.a., I'm not sure what it is now.

John
 
A picture tells a thousand words, but sound tells a thousand pictures.

Peter Groom
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Joined: Apr 2 2008

Theres an interesting point here.

The original post said "will it NEED a license to operate"
The answer to that is NO. The mic will work perfectly fine irrespective of if you have bought a license.
Should you have a license. Thats the yes. If you want to operate within the rules / law / beurocratic red tape etc. BUT Id add that in my 25 years in Tv ive met very few professional sound recordists that actually do have a license on ch69.
Peter

MAGLINK
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Joined: Mar 8 2007
Peter Groom wrote:
Theres an interesting point here.

The original post said "will it NEED a license to operate"
The answer to that is NO. The mic will work perfectly fine irrespective of if you have bought a license.
Should you have a license. Thats the yes. If you want to operate within the rules / law / beurocratic red tape etc. BUT Id add that in my 25 years in Tv ive met very few professional sound recordists that actually do have a license on ch69.
Peter

You take the risk and pay the fine then!

Peter Groom
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Joined: Apr 2 2008

Hi Gary - hope youre well.
I agree, but Im a studio boy as you know and very rarely step into shooting land myself. I was merely pointing out the difference between "must" and "ought"

Additionally, is there any track record of any policing and people turning up at a shoot to enforce these rules anyway? Id suggest not, as I said, field recordists often dont have a license .
Peter

John Willett
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Peter Groom wrote:
Theres an interesting point here.

The original post said "will it NEED a license to operate"
The answer to that is NO. The mic will work perfectly fine irrespective of if you have bought a license.
Should you have a license. Thats the yes. If you want to operate within the rules / law / beurocratic red tape etc.

Very bad advice here.

You NEED a licence to operate Ch.38 in the same way that you need a licence to drive a car.

Sorry - it's the law.

Peter Groom wrote:
BUT Id add that in my 25 years in Tv ive met very few professional sound recordists that actually do have a license on ch69.

And these recordists are now in deep sh*t.

The Government is paying lots of cash out to recordists who have been properly licensed to swap all their kit over to Ch.38. These recordists without a licence get nothing.

And the law is very tough operating without a licence - the fine can be as high as £10,000, up to 5 years in prison and confiscation of all equipment (and that could include mics, mixer and camera, etc.).

Also - I expect to see a lot more policing now. The Government are selling off the frequencies up to Ch.69 for a trans-European wireless broadband network. I would expect tough action on people who illegally transmit here and I would also expect better policing of Ch.38.

But the licence is cheap - less than £2 a week.

John
 
A picture tells a thousand words, but sound tells a thousand pictures.

John Willett
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Peter Groom wrote:
Additionally, is there any track record of any policing and people turning up at a shoot to enforce these rules anyway? Id suggest not, as I said, field recordists often don't have a license .
Peter

Yes, there is.

I have know investigation division turn up unannounced and demand to see the licenses.

Also - the rules on Ch.38 are very tough this year as there are massive exclusion zones to protect Radio Astronomy - you have to switch to Ch.39 or Ch.40 in these exclusion areas.

Also - be careful - please note that advising someone to use Ch.38 without a licence is deemed to be incitement to commit a crime.

John
 
A picture tells a thousand words, but sound tells a thousand pictures.

paulears
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Joined: Jul 8 2008

Those that didn't have the license, also lost out on the recent compensation - I had lots of kit I surrendered and have been using the compensation to buy new kit. It's also worth noting that Ofcom/JFMG will be working hard next year because of the olympics - not enough space for the users, so you can bet if you appear with your kit and don't have a license, the response will be tough - maybe even seizure. People who do have a license are the ones with the rights to use it, so given two video crews one with, and one without a license - guess who will win? Interference in some parts of the country will be severe without proper control, and instant solutions will be required. They can seize equipment being operated without a license - part of the old Wireless telegraphy act, and incorporated into subsequent newer legislation - so I bet money on them simply taking it off you without the right bit of paper!

John Willett
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paulears wrote:
Those that didn't have the license, also lost out on the recent compensation - I had lots of kit I surrendered and have been using the compensation to buy new kit. It's also worth noting that Ofcom/JFMG will be working hard next year because of the olympics - not enough space for the users, so you can bet if you appear with your kit and don't have a license, the response will be tough - maybe even seizure. People who do have a license are the ones with the rights to use it, so given two video crews one with, and one without a license - guess who will win? Interference in some parts of the country will be severe without proper control, and instant solutions will be required. They can seize equipment being operated without a license - part of the old Wireless telegraphy act, and incorporated into subsequent newer legislation - so I bet money on them simply taking it off you without the right bit of paper!

I agree - I would suspect that anyone turning up anywhere near the Olympics with unlicensed equipment is very likely to get it seized.

It's crazy not to have a licence - it's cheap.

Also - frequencies were nearly lost completely; because so few people had licenses the Government thought that no-one was using the frequencies and it took a good hard fight to prove that they were being used and to get Ch.38.

Now the Government know there has been a lot of unlisensed use, I would expect them to get a lot tougher with illegal use.

John
 
A picture tells a thousand words, but sound tells a thousand pictures.

John Willett
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Note of caution - I have just seen this posted on a professional Broadcast forum:-

Quote:
Just a note of caution, I gather that OFCOM are becoming much more interested in the whole business of people running kit without licences, or outside their licence provisions. be aware that if I remember rightly, if they catch you using kit without the right licence, they can fine you many thousands of pounds, and condfiscate your kit, and ANY OTHER EQUIPMENT ATTATCHED TO IT - so - when you plug your unlicenced receiver into the cameraman's own XDCAM, think about the possible consequences......

John
 
A picture tells a thousand words, but sound tells a thousand pictures.

paulears
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Indeed - up until now, OFCOM have been only taking action on life and death stuff, as they closed down the old Radio Investigation Department quite a while ago - so their effort has been towards protected services - police, fire, ambulance, coast guard etc. Now the majority of these are using the combined airwave TETRA system, interference and interception have become less, and with the prominence of the olympics, and the huge influx of radio users from abroad, they're going to be working very hard to prevent interference. They've tended to seize illegal radio FM broadcasters equipment when they close them down, but they take the whole lot - computers, electronics and everything - NOT just the transmitters.

Common sense would probably prevail where equipment ownership is different, but this would probably be sorted out later on, so they take the kit, take advice from the legal bods and then maybe give some back.

There is a huge amount of unlicensed and wrong band kit about. As I;m usually to be found in theatres, I find it quite interesting how many visiting companies have kit on very odd channels - often the US ones.

Annoyingly, as a post script - I opened a flight case today in the store, looking for some headphones I knew were inside, and found 2 Sennheiser G2's I forgot to put on my surrender list! At least I still have something for channel 70 now!

HallmarkProductions
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Joined: Aug 29 1999

"Annoyingly, as a post script - I opened a flight case today in the store, looking for some headphones I knew were inside, and found 2 Sennheiser G2's I forgot to put on my surrender list! At least I still have something for channel 70 now!"

I have put-up for surrender all of our G2s, but, your comment raises an interesting point. I was wondering whether to keep a set as a spare, especially the 500 series (phantom power and headphone input), which may be useful as a backup for busy times.

Chris
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