cleaning background noise 2

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Bob Aldis
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Joined: Mar 7 2001

Trying out the tips on the other thread, I suddenly realised that I don't know how to produce an mp3 or preferably a WAV from the premiere 6.5 soundtrack. Can anyone give me a clue please.

BobA

Bob Aldis

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

pretty sure you can < File Export WAV> as you would to create a movie

whayt i would do to create an MP3 is to download (free) a prog called CDeX

Alan Craven
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Joined: Jan 26 2001

If you look at the Export item in the File menu, I think you will find that "Audio" is the third item. This will export the audio only of your timeline as a .wav file.

If you want to create mp3 files, you will need to upgrade to Premiere Pro, where the Adobe Media Encoder will oblige.

Bob Aldis
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Joined: Mar 7 2001

I would prefer .wav. When I choose export audio, the only choice I get is .AVI and when I change the end to .wav it plays on everything, but neither Audacity or MPegstream seem to be able to deal with it.

BobA

Bob Aldis

Bob Aldis
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Bob Aldis wrote:
I would prefer .wav. When I choose export audio, the only choice I get is .AVI and when I change the end to .wav it plays on everything, but neither Audacity or MPegstream seem to be able to deal with it.

BobA

Which then loads in cool edit and converts to wav which Audacity recognises.

A bit convoluted but it works. It gives me a chance to try the noise cleaner but will have to eventually find something simpler if I use it much.

BobA

Bob Aldis

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999
Bob Aldis wrote:
I would prefer .wav. When I choose export audio, the only choice I get is .AVI and when I change the end to .wav it plays on everything, but neither Audacity or MPegstream seem to be able to deal with it.

BobA

Bob

It's just a matter of getting the Settings right when you go to /Export Timeline/Audio. you can select WAV as your format and decide whether you want 32 / 44.1 / 48K etc. Look for the Settings button.

Quite often I use Prem 6.5 purely as an audio program - making up chains of audio clips linked with crossfades is so quick and easy using the Audio Crossfade Tool (one of the many tools left out of Premiere Pro - grrr!)

Ray

Alan Craven
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Joined: Jan 26 2001
RayL wrote:
Bob

.....
Quite often I use Prem 6.5 purely as an audio program - making up chains of audio clips linked with crossfades is so quick and easy using the Audio Crossfade Tool (one of the many tools left out of Premiere Pro - grrr!)

Ray

You have a choice of two X-fades in Pro, Ray, Constant Power and Constant Gain. you will find them in Audio Effects.

What I have done is made myself a "Favourites" bin in the Effects Panel, and copied the half dozen or so video and audio Effects and Transitions that I use into that, so it is a simple matter to drag whatever I want onto the cut line in the timeline

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999
Alan Craven wrote:
You have a choice of two X-fades in Pro, Ray, Constant Power and Constant Gain. you will find them in Audio Effects.

What I have done is made myself a "Favourites" bin in the Effects Panel, and copied the half dozen or so video and audio Effects and Transitions that I use into that, so it is a simple matter to drag whatever I want onto the cut line in the timeline

But it's still slo-o-o-w to drag effects into place each time. With 6.5's Audio Crossfade Tool the mouse ponter stays on the timeline and three clicks will put in place two crossfades between three clips - AND the crossfades will automatically fit.

Moving the mouse pointer backwards and forwards across the screen just has to be slower and less efficient - and do you always want the crossfades to be the default duration? If you don't (and why should you? - different pieces of music need different lengths of transition) then you are in for more fiddling around.

Ray

Bob Aldis
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Joined: Mar 7 2001
RayL wrote:
Bob

It's just a matter of getting the Settings right when you go to /Export Timeline/Audio. you can select WAV as your format and decide whether you want 32 / 44.1 / 48K etc. Look for the Settings button.

Quite often I use Prem 6.5 purely as an audio program - making up chains of audio clips linked with crossfades is so quick and easy using the Audio Crossfade Tool (one of the many tools left out of Premiere Pro - grrr!)

Ray

Eureka! Thanks Ray I have changed my audio to wav. I saw it in general settings, but was afraid it would change the audio output when exporting video. It looks as though the audio output stays the same on video output.

I suppose you can still fade with rubber banding in Pro?

BobA

Bob Aldis

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999
Bob Aldis wrote:

I suppose you can still fade with rubber banding in Pro?

BobA

Bob

Yes, but the Adobe designers chose to make you jump through hoops to do it . You have to change your pointer for a pen tool and then hold keys down. All very silly and time-wasting.

Ray

Alan Craven
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Joined: Jan 26 2001

Obviously it would not do for us all to be the same, Ray, but the more you expound upon your way of working, the more cumbersome it seems to me!

To me it seems far simpler to keep my eyes on the monitor and my right hand on the mouse, using my left hand for the (very) occasional key stroke, rather than have my hands shifting around all over the keyboard.

We are very fortunate that the software designers try to cater for all tastes. But look how much space a software installation takes up these days, and think how much more space it would take up if a new version of the software retained all the old dog's tricks as well as all the new (and obviously totally indispensible:rolleyes: ) new tricks.

I suppose this will earn for me yet another of your dismissive posts.:( :

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

Ah, Alan, you're taking it all too personally! My annoyance is directed at Adobe's designers who, in my opinion, made some very bad choices when they failed to update 6.5 properly. Instead they produced a flawed and deficient product. I would very much like to have an update for 6.5 - but Premiere Pro isn't it. Many of the flaws have nothing to do with leaving in features that make the program too big - they are things like the severely reduced visibilty of crosshatching on disabled clips or the need to hold down a key when selecting Multitrack Select. They are things that make no difference to the size of the program but are simply changes for the worse with no good reason for doing so.

I'm puzzled about your comment > hands shifting around all over the keyboard< When are my hands shifting all over the keyboard while using 6.5 in the way that I use it?

You are in North Yorkshire and I am in South London. Would, say, Leicester be about half-way? Is there perhaps someone in Leicestershire who could host a series of time trials? We each bring our computer and with the aid of a stop-watch we could see which version of Premiere offers the most efficient way of working. Any offers? Perhaps the results could be put on U-tube and then even the short-sighted Premiere designers might get to see them (they refuse to answer letters or emails)

Ray

Alan Craven
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Joined: Jan 26 2001

An interesting idea, but the results would not be statistically valid, I am afraid. Inept and inconsiderate as Adobe are they would latch on to that!

Your idea does not allow for the fact that one of us may be quicker at performing their method than the other is at their chosen method. An obvious example from my point of view is that I am temporarily (I fear permanently) handicapped due to my sawing off the end half inch in my left thumb back in the summer.

Additionally, I am taking off on my annual migration to the sunny south on Tuesday.:D

Barry Hunter
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Joined: Nov 30 2001

Additionally, I am taking off on my annual migration to the sunny south on Tuesday.:D

Got your passport?

Barry Hunter videos4all.org

Bob Aldis
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Joined: Mar 7 2001

I am very impressed with Audacity for noise reduction. I tried a clip with extreme wind noise just to try, and it completely took out all the wind. It is not perfect, there are some strange underwater noises and voices have an unnatural sound, but I think that using both soundtracks and careful blending and fading, anything important could be improved if not made perfect. That particular clip does not warrent the time needed, but I think back wistfully to some old stuff I have dealt with and wonder.

BobA

Bob Aldis

foxvideo
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Joined: Sep 9 1999

I was shown a technique recently using Audacity. You can zoom the timeline to sample level - shows as small dots. Selecting several of the samples where the audio has clipped and by using the 'repair' function can bring that clipped audio back to a level where it doesn't sound quite as bad as it would. The truth is you can't replace clipped audio as such, but the technique certainly helps to improve it.

Dave Farrants Fox Video Editing