A different timelapse

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Chrome
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Joined: May 26 1999

I don't normally post links to my work, as much of it is for large corporates who don't want me distributing their finished adverts or films.

However I had an unused and slightly unusual timelapse piece left over, so posted it here... :D

mooblie
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Joined: Apr 27 2001

Interesting. How come the shadows from the stationary objects don't seem to move round visibly?? :confused:

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

Chrome
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Joined: May 26 1999

Special Effects? No... err... I suppose it was only filmed over about 1.5 hours, so the sun would not really have moved too much.
Which objects did you mean specifically?

mooblie
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I would have thought the shadow of the arch across the wall of new bricks, or the shadow of the warning lamp would have moved visibly - obviously I'm wrong. Anyway - nice work!

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

Rob James
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Joined: Jun 26 2001

Very good! Maybe worth pointing out that 'pug' is a generic term applied to all rudimentary sand and cement mortars by builders everywhere.

Rob The picture is only there to keep the sound in sync

branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

Except in Yarkshire!
Funny to watch the little fat bloke doing his stuff near the end. He spends a lot of time watching followed by a brief spurt with a brush.
Now NL editors can see where the original rendering comes from.

Do not follow, I may not lead. Do not lead . . . I may not follow.

Chrome
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Joined: May 26 1999

That's actually 'Fat Bob' branny, and the two guys he's working with are brothers (I think might even be twins), and in fact his first cousins.

Brickmaking as an industry (what's left of it), in some places still appears to be a bit of a closed shop and many of the workers we spoke to are third or fourth generation ( a bit like coal mining), and often related to each other.

In some ways, like mining and other 'traditional' British industries such as textiles and shipbuilding the communities grew up around the major employer or industry in a particular area, so it was natural for grandfather, farther, son progression. After the second world war a lot of Polish, Italian and more recently asian workers were brought into the industry, but not where this piece was filmed.

Mike Pulcinella
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Joined: Jan 30 2007

I like the way it's shot but I don't think the time lapse was fast enough. It took too long to happen and I grew bored and skipped ahead. it's a good little clip but would have been more effective if it had been half as long IMO.

Flame1
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Joined: Apr 21 2007

I found it fascinating.

My father was a builder who came from Italy and found work here after the war for a company called Redland brick, or something like that in Bedford. He tried to get me to become a builder:D maybe I should have said yes!!:)

Then I saw the Milton Keynes corporate clip. Absolutely fantastic.

Cheers,:)

Flame

Chrome
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Joined: May 26 1999

Thanks for your comments guys... I think you'r right about duration Mike. I cut a bit out, but it certainly could do with a 50% interest does wain. However cutting too much out makes it jump a bit too much at this stage. Next time for something similar instead of 1 frame a second (as used here) I will make it 1 frame every 4 or 6 seconds.

The real problem of using times of less than once a second, is of course that the workers movements appear to be far less coordinated and the process of picking up bricks and placing the same bricks in place would be lost.

Thanks for the comment on the other MK video Flame... It was a farily low budget job, but a copy of that film went to every sports team taking part in the Olympics in Beijing. :D