Good Lapel/Lavalier Mic For $100?

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SonicOrbStudios
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Joined: Nov 24 2010

So for the longest time I've been using an Azden SGM1x shotgun mic and it's nice but I still pick up a lot of room noise when the blower for the AC/heat kicks on in the studio and so I was thinking about going with a Lapel/Lavalier mic that's much closer to the subject and therefore would not need so much gain.

Thing is, I've seen a lot of great products but they are a little too high in price for me.
I'm usually recording audio to my Canon Vixia HFS100 camera which offers a mini jack however I also have the ability to record though an audio interface to the PC and sync the two parts in post.

So for around $100...is there any Lapel/Lavalier mic with XLR type connection that's worth even using?
Any other suggestions?

Thanks

Dave

mooblie
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$100?!! Are you planning on a wirelink or radiolink between the mic and camera?

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

SonicOrbStudios
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In this price range, wired is a must and for my studio, I can't see ever needing wireless.

I can go a little over $100 which is why I said "around".......but I'd rather not go for something over $150...

Dave

mooblie
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I don't really have much experience of different lavaliers (only Sennheiser), but the Sennheiser MZA 900 P will allow you to connect a 3.5mm terminated lav to a long XLR-XLR cable.

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

SonicOrbStudios
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I've been using an XLR to TRS adapter cable for a while now to connect the Azden Shotgun to my cam and it's worked well so I am not really looking for solutions at that step, but rather at what mics to get.

Dave

MAGLINK
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Joined: Mar 8 2007

Audio Tech make some reasonable budget mic's and one of these should suit your needs:http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/352162-REG/Audio_Technica_PRO_70_Pro_70_Cardioid_Lavalier.html

SonicOrbStudios
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Dave

sleepytom
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I think i used to have that mic. It was a similar Audio-Technica mic anyway. It was good enough quality given its low cost though the trailing cable is a bit of an issue if your subject moves around the cable dragging on things can be picked up by the mic. Though this is a general issue with mic cables and not something specific to Audio-Technica.

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MAGLINK
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SonicOrbStudios wrote:
looks fair, has anyone had any experience with the AT831B?
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/68270-REG/Audio_Technica_AT831B_AT831B_Mini_Clip_On.html

That was one I was going to recommend too but as you said no more than $150 I didnt mention it.

AT mics are generally very well made and sound good for their price, I have two AT 875R small shotgun mics that are used on a lot of my productions.

HallmarkProductions
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Joined: Aug 29 1999

You could always look for a secondhand Sony ECM 77 which would come in around £100

Chris
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SonicOrbStudios
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Joined: Nov 24 2010

yea I'm thinking it may be best to spend a little extra and just buy the AT831B as it will probably sound a little better.
The Cardioid pickup pattern would cut down on room noise even a bit more as well.

Dave

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

there's nothing wrong with trailing lavalier leads,

unless you need wireless, use a lead.

Loads of Tv current affairs used wired mics long after everybody outside was convinced that they'd be using wireless. They're way cheaper and unless you're interviewing a gymnast, wired is fine.

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

Speakers with some experience of being interviewed have no problem with wired mics. They are people who know how to hold the eyeline until the cue light has gone off and know that they have to stay seated until a clear is called and to wait to have their mic removed.

The problem comes with inexperienced speakers, those who give their closing answer then immediately turn their head and ask "was that all right?". Those who don't wait for the cue light to go off before getting up and walking away with the mic cable trailing until it tightens and either pulls out the plug or (usually) breaks the cable because an XLR is a latching connector. Or, if you're really unlucky and you've plugged the mic directly into the camera, pulls over both the tripod and the camera.

For all of these people, the radio mic was invented.

Ray L

dominicwitherow
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Joined: Apr 2 2006
DAVE M wrote:
there's nothing wrong with trailing lavalier leads,

unless you need wireless, use a lead.

Loads of Tv current affairs used wired mics long after everybody outside was convinced that they'd be using wireless. They're way cheaper and unless you're interviewing a gymnast, wired is fine.

That's certainly the case with BBC News teams, where a Z1 and plug-in lavalier remains standard for pre-recorded stories. D

SonicOrbStudios
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Joined: Nov 24 2010

yea I do work for my college TV station and we are all wired for the studio shoots although we have some wireless Senn mics which work well for the field productions.

I will be using this mic on myself most of the time in my studio so wired isn't at all an issue.

So although it's a bit higher in price than I'd like, it looks like the AT831B is a great start for me.

Dave

HallmarkProductions
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We use wired for nearly all of our news standups and reports. However, wireless is useful when the reporter is a long way from the camera (eg when looking down on the reporter when in a crowd etc), or wants to do a walking shot.

We use the Sennheiser SKP plug-in transmitter quite often.

Chris
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