Guitar --> Computer

8 replies [Last post]
JMCP
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Joined: Nov 21 2000

Hi,

I have just acquired an electro acoustic guitar and I am wondering if it is possible to connect directly from it to my laptop ? If yes, do I need any special audio recording software or will the sound recorder software that comes with Windows XP be sufficient for messing around with ?

Just to clarify, this is only for my own education and not for any professional sound recording.

Cheers John

rongrover
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Joined: Jun 1 2002

Hi John. If, to use your own words, for messing around with, I suggest that all you need do is to use a mic to record with and this can be connected to your laptop mic input.

Windows recorder will be ok, but you will soon be looking for something better. However, it will get you started which at this stage is the important thing.

All the best, Ron.

John Willett
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Joined: Jun 1 2001

The other method is to use a DI box and go in direct.

John

John
 
A picture tells a thousand words, but sound tells a thousand pictures.

JMCP
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Joined: Nov 21 2000

Hi,

Ron, that is certainly worth thinking about in the short term. Thanks.

John, I don't know anything about DI boxes so I have just done some googling to try and understand them and I am still mighty confused but, I am have found plenty for sale which don't cost a fortune. Can you advise on the box in the following link or give me a recommendation.

http://www.dv247.com/invt/4661

Cheers John

rongrover
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Joined: Jun 1 2002

John (JMCP) the DI box is just used as a link between in your case a guitar and the laptop. There is even a very good description on the link you gave.

All the best, Ron.

JMCP
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Joined: Nov 21 2000

Hi Ron, is this box just an amplifier but does not output via a speaker instead it outputs via it's line out ?

Cheers John

rongrover
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Joined: Jun 1 2002

Hi John. I am sure that John Willett or many of the others are better qualified than I am to really answer your questions. However, the reasons I came in on this is that recently I started taking a greater interest in Audio/Sound Recording, mainly because I wanted to make CD Recordings of Stories I make up for my grandchildren. I started using microsoft soundrecorder, this is ok, but can be limited. But there are many other free recorders available.
Audacity being a vey good free recorder/editer.

Within my stories I have added sound effects and music, in many cases this has been done as explained previously by using microphones picking up sounds. Even in serious recordings situations, this is how it is done to pick up sound.

My understanding Of the need for a DI Box is because signals from electrnic instruments, such as guitars, keyboards etc generally have a low level, high impedance output, which will not interface with the low impedance balanced input foound on most sound mixing equipment.
If you would like to learn more about it this is a good report.
http://www.leonaudio.com.au/active.htm

Also for further information this links in to many sites and also about the AR-133 box which I have been told is very good.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&q=what+is+a+di+box+used+for&btnG=Search

However, to get started as mentioned, I really do suggest that you just use a mic.

As far as you last question is concerned, I stand to be corrected but I am not aware that you can or should connect speakers to a DI Box.

Good luck with your recording, Ron.

John Willett
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Joined: Jun 1 2001
Quote:
Originally posted by JMCP:
is this (DI) box just an amplifier but does not output via a speaker instead it outputs via it's line out ?

Basically, in its simplest form, a DI box is just a transformer - it converts a guitar impedance into one suitable to go into a mic. or line input.

Some DI boxes can even take line level or loudspeaker level in - if the guitarist wants the effects from his amp or combo.

More sophisticated versions are active and electronic.

I hope this helps.

John

John
 
A picture tells a thousand words, but sound tells a thousand pictures.

JMCP
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Joined: Nov 21 2000

Guys,

thanks for the explanations, most helpful.

Cheers John