JVC PD1 massive pricedrop

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cyberwest
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Joined: Sep 13 2000

Thought people might want to see this:

http://www.askdirect.co.uk/uview?call=ask.productSearch&id=2345

Pretty amazing change in price - probably because it never really was high definition and nobody bought it as a result. But at that price, it's a temption proposition for DV.

James Morris

mooblie
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Joined: Apr 27 2001

MDV? So what video resolution/format is that?

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

Dave R Smith
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Joined: May 10 2005

It's their abbreviation for MiniDv:-

'to record high-definition images on MDV tape!'
'MPEG-2 recording to MiniDV cassette '

Dave.

cyberwest
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Joined: Sep 13 2000

The description is somewhat BS, but it's a pretty good camcorder for £899. It has a much higher colour resolution than other single-CCD models. Although it doesn't actually do HDV like the HD1 it's based on, the widescreen performance is very good with DV or its MPEG-2 format.

James Morris

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

Poor old JVC. Sony's HC1 at less than £1200 made people burst out laughing at the PD1, so in reality it was only finding its true price point. The JVC may well be listed as 'Half Price!' but it isn't, it's 'Real Price!'

tom.

Gavin Gration
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Joined: Jul 29 1999
Wtf

I'm amazed that JVC get away with plastering HDD all over their camcorders alongside TVs that are labelled HD ready. Talk about confusing.

I thought JVC had lost the plot about 10 years ago when they launched an SVHSC camera with MONO suond!! Now they've started writing their own script.

cyberwest
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Joined: Sep 13 2000

Yeah, I think you're right Tom. £899 is about right really for that camcorder. It never should have been so expensive, and god only knows why they took the HDV functionality away before bringing it to Europe. I'm sure they really regret that now. Surely there must be some way of creating a firmware that gives it a true 720p mode. I guess not...

James Morris

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

You did the write-up for CV didn't you James?

Alan Roberts
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Joined: May 3 1999

When the HDV version (720p) of it was launched, there was no prospect of any European market for 720p. So it launched as a 720p/60 camera in the then existing HD countries. Since the original camera concept was (still is) a good one, they made a 50Hz version for the rest of the world. There would have been no point in making it 720p/50 because there was no such "standard" so it became an SD camera with really good lens and resolution. Since the electronics runs fast enough, they made it do 576p/50 which isnuseless for TV but really good for lots of other things. It was a camera ahead of its time (not unusual for JVC) but without a market.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.

cyberwest
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Joined: Sep 13 2000

Yes, I did the review - and got a bit swept along by the confusing marketing literature. But it is a good DV camera. As Alan says, it has a good lens and resolution. And good audio as well. I bought a Panasonic NVGS400B about a year ago, but if the PD1 had been £899 then I would have considered buying that instead. The Hybrid colour CCD does actually work - its fidelity is very good.

James Morris

infocus
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Joined: Jul 18 2003
cyberwest wrote:
...........it's a temption proposition for DV.

I think it needs to come down a lot more than that to be at all tempting. And Toms comparison with the HC1 hits the nail neatly on the head - the latter offers far more than £300 worth of extra value, IMO.

Whilst most of the criticism surrounding the PD1 concerned buyers confusing JVCs "Hi-Res" marketing claims with High Definition, it's worth recalling a few other things which don't really make it the best SD camera.

For starters it's single chip, and 1/3" chip - BUT, and a very big but, is that for normal DV shooting only a small portion of the pixels, at the centre of the chip, are used. The full sensor area is only used for still photographs. Compared to other cameras, this brings about at least two serious disadvantages - sensitivity and angle of view. For 4:3 DV shooting, it effectively equates to a (approx) 1/5" chip coupled with a focal length lens suited to a 1/3" chip. Hence poor low light capability, and a narrow angle of view at wide angle.

A colleague of mine did buy a PD1 for personal use (and now swears he will never buy JVC again) under the impression he was getting an HD camera. Whilst the colour fidelity may be OK under good light, it is very poor as the light drops, even whilst other cameras in the price range are still giving good results. With the current range of true HD HDV cameras, £899 still seems too much for this camera. A quick search on google revealed places still offering PD1s for £2,000 plus. No comment.

An interesting thought occurs to me. As Alan says, "...... it launched as a 720p/60 camera in the then existing HD countries", which then begs the question that if they were able to do 720p/60 with the HD1, why can't the HD100 be 50/60p?

cyberwest
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Joined: Sep 13 2000

I was just waiting for you to comment, Infocus...

:D

James Morris

Alan Roberts
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Both the original JVC HD camera (who's numnber escapes me) and the HD100 run at 60Hz (ok, the Euro version of the HD100 runs at 50Hz), but the recorders run at half those rates, repeating frames on replay. Both cameras are ok for film-style jerky motion but useless for smooth motion at tv rates.

As yet, there is still no hardware compressor available for running at 50p, whether for 720 or 1080 lines. That's why they aren't on the market yet.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.