The Making of a Clip - Part 1

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Mike Pulcinella
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Joined: Jan 30 2007

Hey everyone! Sorry it's been a while since I've been here, I've been really busy with video work. I'm not complaining!! It's all good!

I thought you all might be interested in a project I'm doing over at musculardevelopment.com. As I've said in a previous thread, I've been made a Forum Leader in charge of helping the musclehead lifters and bodybuilders learn to make and post better videos. This is an example of the usual quality one can expect from them. (You don't have to watch the whole thing, I'm sure you will quickly understand what I'm up against.)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=kVdZqephnBI

Boring, right?

In order to demonstrate some of the basic methods of shooting and editing that we use to enhance a clip I decided to tape a fairly simple single lift and then take my "students" through the editing steps that we here all take for granted. I want to turn it into something special and show them how it's done.

Here is my first post with the explanation of my project.

http://www.vimeo.com/1120784

I'll post the various revisions of the clip here on DV doctor as I go along. As always any feedback or input is appreciated.

Thanks!
Mike

David L Lewis
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Joined: Jan 11 2006

I await with interest.

I recently went on a video skills course and one of the exercises was to simply film a man walking from his house to another about a mile away . Pretty boring stuff, until you start realising how much there is around you that you can use to "shorten time" and make the whole thing so much more interesting.

David L Lewis

Hello I'm in Mensa, Is there anything you would like me to explain to you?

Mike Pulcinella
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Joined: Jan 30 2007

That sounds like an awesome project to me! I love simplicity. One of my favorite books is called The Mezzanine by Nicholson Baker.

From the book jacket:

"Although most of the action of The Mezzanine occurs on the escalator of an office building, where its narrator is returning to work after buying shoelace, this startlingly inventive and witty novel takes us farther than most fiction written today. It lends to milk cartons the associative richness of Marcel Proust's madeleines. It names the eight most significant advances in a human life - beginning with shoe tying. It asks whether the hot air blowers in bathrooms really are more sanitary than towels. And it casts a dazzling light on our revelations with the objects and people we usually take for granted."

I've probably read that book at least a half dozen times since getting it.