Microphones for commentary & microphones for capturing fight noises

4 replies [Last post]
tomtailford
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Joined: Oct 17 2007

I've got a budget of £0-£50 and need two microphones for commentary.

I also need a table top stand and would like if they were included in the price!

There will be noise from crowd etc. to consider.

Also, I want to buy 3-4 microphones for capturing the grunts, thumps and bumps of fighting!

Any suggestions? Ideally within £0-50 budget... I know it's not much.

I do have a Sony ME66/K6 kit

Tom

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

to be honest - increase the budget!

The only suggestion that I can make would be to add the commentary afterwards - thus reducing the crowd problem and even allowing one mic between the two commentators - or them to "share" the mic by starting and stopping the commentary.

Then you could concentrate on using the seen set-up to pick up the fight noise. Probably pointing it directly at teh ring as close as poss (maybe in a corner) . It will pickmup the crowd as well. I'd guess that keeping it low and pointing "up" to the fighters would be a start. That should lessen the crowd noise.

In an ideal world, you'd get a pair of Coles mics for the commentary
http://www.coleselectroacoustics.com/miccommentators.shtml

MAGLINK
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Joined: Mar 8 2007

Some shure SM58 type mics will be fine for the commentary but put some foam wind gags on to cut down the proximity effect. Also roll off the bass at around 150hz. The coles mics are OK for pro use but to be honnest they sound dreadful, expensive (£400 each) and are mainly for football etc. When I have done snooker we used the SM58's and on athletics etc headset mics are used a lot now but would be too open for boxing etc.

Also the fight sounds are best picked up with your shotgun set-up but there is a main thing that will be essential, good limiters or compressors as the levels coming into a mixer from commentary mics can be very very very LOUD!!!
Do a test with a mixer set-up and limiter/compressor set-up and shout as loud as you can into the mics, they must not distort as that will sound really bad.

As said it may be better to do the commentary afterwards (or off screen as it is known in broadcast) but if you want to get the feel on the night then you will have to set things up very carefully.

paulears
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Joined: Jul 8 2008

The foam windshields don't do anything whatsoever to reduce the huge amounts of extra bass proximity effect causes, but they do get rid of some of the top end blasting when people shout! If you can provide the windshielding and have a decent graphic that you can use before the recorder, then even a 58 sounds not too bad at all. The sound from Coles are just noise free(ish) and once blended with the live sound, provide the necessary clarity.

MAGLINK
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Joined: Mar 8 2007
paulears wrote:
The foam windshields don't do anything whatsoever to reduce the huge amounts of extra bass proximity effect causes, but they do get rid of some of the top end blasting when people shout! If you can provide the windshielding and have a decent graphic that you can use before the recorder, then even a 58 sounds not too bad at all. The sound from Coles are just noise free(ish) and once blended with the live sound, provide the necessary clarity.

Yes they do help but it is more heath robinson to keep the commentator from getting too close to the capsule, the wind gags I mean are the large ones which will keep the mouth a fixed distance from the capsule much like the lip shield on the lip ribbon.
Also the lip ribbon by nature of design is a ribbon mic and is very low level so it may need a specialist mic pre-amp for you to get enough gain. On ITV outside broadcasts we used specialist comms boxes which had all the talback and headphone feeds they also had mic amps in them and we could set the gain in the comentary box. Glennsound is one make as an example.