No copyright extension for songs

5 replies [Last post]
Z Cheema
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Joined: Nov 17 2003

Looks as though the 50 year copyright on songs has not been extended to 95 years, seems they will have to earn a proper living like the rest of us.

"You can make a record in 1955 and have been getting royalties... been living on that and suddenly they're gone."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6186436.stm

PaulD
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Joined: Aug 31 2002

Hi
"The situation only applies to recording artists, however, as composers and their families retain copyright on musical scores until 70 years after the author's death."
So even if you get the music off a <50+ year old 78 (or early 33/45) record you still have to clear the music publishing rights.

Z Cheema
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Joined: Nov 17 2003

There was good explanation on today's working lunch (27th Nov 2006)

You can see a recording here when it goes up on the web page

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/working_lunch/5170354.stm

H and M Video
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Joined: Jun 5 1999

"So even if you get the music off a <50+ year old 78 (or early 33/45) record you still have to clear the music publishing rights."

True, but it is easier to get permission to play the copyright via MCPS than it is to get permission to use a performance by an artist.

Harry

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Bob Aldis
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Joined: Mar 7 2001

I am a little unclear about this. Does this mean that an old pre 56 record can be copied and used privately but not used for public performance? Can they be downloaded legally?

BobA

Bob Aldis

Z Cheema
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Joined: Nov 17 2003

Watch the Working lunch program that might help

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/working_lunch/5187378.stm