Real Bad problems, please help

3 replies [Last post]
BenFuller
Offline
Joined: Nov 22 2001

i have just my own amd system, spec is here:

Athlon 1.4ghz
Maxtor 40gb 7200 rpm
Matrox millenium g450 dual head 16mb
Elite K7s5a DDR Motherboard
256mb samsung PC2100
Running Windows ME (i cant afford anything better)
IEEE1394 Firewire controller
SoundBlaster Live! Player 1024
V.92 56k Modem

Heres my problem,

my modem and soundcard dont work, im 99% sure that the problem is to do with interrupt requests on all my equipment (IRQS), but dont know how to change them, ive tried to change them in windows, buti get an error message saying that the value cannot be changed after i have disabled auto settings, and i can see no way of changing them in bios either.

Can somebody please help me out?

a little info on irqs in general and how to get my modem and soundcard working (definatley not a driver problem!) would be greatly recieved.

Thanks in advance,

Ben Fuller

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i am on msn messenger at therewasalwaysmore@hotmail.com

and on aol messenger at : benfuller2001

ECS K7S5A, 256MB DDR, 40GB MAXTOR, MATROX G450 MILLENIUM DUALHEAD, ATHLON 1900+XP, WINDOWS XP PRO, PREMIERE 6.01, AVID DVXPRESS 2, AFTER EFFECTS 5 PRODUCTION BUNDLE, (SOMEONE SELL ME A GOOD DV EDIT BUNDLE!)

BenFuller
Offline
Joined: Nov 22 2001

Oops i missed a bit, here are the current irqs i have

onboard sound - irq 11
firewire card - irq 5
usb controller 1 - irq 11
usb controller 2 - irq 11
modem - irq 11
( this is without the soundblaster in my system although i would much rater use the soundblaster than the onboard.)

thanks Ben Fuller

------------------
i am on msn messenger at therewasalwaysmore@hotmail.com

and on aol messenger at : benfuller2001

ECS K7S5A, 256MB DDR, 40GB MAXTOR, MATROX G450 MILLENIUM DUALHEAD, ATHLON 1900+XP, WINDOWS XP PRO, PREMIERE 6.01, AVID DVXPRESS 2, AFTER EFFECTS 5 PRODUCTION BUNDLE, (SOMEONE SELL ME A GOOD DV EDIT BUNDLE!)

bcrabtree
Offline
Joined: Mar 7 1999

Despite reading your comment that you can't afford anything better than Windows ME, I do feel that the best way forward is to move over to XP - starting with a clean install.

If you can't do that, do a clean install of ME - and one where all the cards are NOT installed at the first instance.

Here, from Computer Video magazine's April and October 2001 issues, are the guidelines from Paul Dutton (DVdoctor's technical guru) on how to build a system from scratch.
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From April 2001

There's no magic about building editing systems - irrespective of the processor used. My simple formula works for most motherboards.

1. Build the system but with only the processor, RAM, graphics card and sound card installed.

2. Set up the motherboard's Bios.

3. Install the operating system.

4. Install the latest drivers for the motherboard chipset.

5. Install the latest drivers for the graphics card.

6. Install all operating system hotfixes and service packs.

7. Install the latest sound card drivers, and then the rest of the hardware - along with the latest drivers.
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And here's the October piece, which tells you in which order to install cards - in terms of which to have in and which to put in which slot.

The ever-more - popular DVdoctor-hosted message boards (dvdoctor.net/cgi-bin/ultimate.cgi) regularly carry numerous pleas for help from would-be video editors who are struggling to set up their Windows editing systems. Many of these problems can be easily prevented by careful setting up following the basic steps outlined in this column in the April 2001 issue and the additional guidelines included this month.

The best way to start is to build the system from scratch, rather than upgrading what you have.

When doing this, first build and test the system as a basic PC - leaving the video editing hardware and software until after everything else has been installed and tested.

Do, however, make provision for the editing side of things, reserving a PCI slot for a video-editing card to be installed.

We’d strongly recommend that no card is fitted into PCI slot 1 - the one nearest the AGP slot.

Usually, these two slots share a single interrupt request (IRQ) and putting cards into both can cause conflicts if either card is unable to work as it should on a shared IRQ.

If the video editing card is a dedicated model, rather than a basic OHCI-compatible FireWire card, leave PCI slot 2 free for that card.

Slot 2 should also be used for FireWire cards, unless, that is, the system is to include a hard disk controller card - EIDE or SCSI. In that case, put the controller card in slot 2, and the FireWire card below it in slot 3 (but put the controller card in slot 3 if using a dedicated editing card).

Most systems will also include a sound card, and many will have a PCI modem and a network card, too.

Generally a network card should be in a lower-numbered PCI port than a sound card (le be nearer to the AGP slot) and a sound card should be in a lower-numbered slot than a modem.

For a wide variety of reasons, we’d recommend external modems over internal modems and advise never to use an HSP modem (a ‘soft-modem’) in an editing system.

If an internal modem is to be fitted to the system, see if it’s possible to disable one or both of the PC’s built-in serial ports.

This should make some extra IRQs available - 3 and 4 - and, in our experience, if these IRQs are used by the motherboard’s Bios, the system will be more stable.

If fitting a sound card into a motherboard that has integrated audio, make sure the built-in audio is disabled before installing the sound card.

Many sound cards work better if they can run on IRQs and, hopefully, following our guidelines will mean that IRQ5 is available.

Don’t assume, though, that you must use a sound card rather than a motherboard’s audio - the performance from built-in audio can be more than satisfactory.

All the above is merely rule-of-thumb advice. There are no absolutes, simply because there are no true standards in motherboard design - unfortunately there is a large number of variations in the way PCI IRQ routing and PCI slot-IRQ sharing work on different mainboards.

So, clearly, our advice doesn’t guarantee your success. That being so, if you do hit a brickwall, you’ll of course need to get up to the board and post your own plea for help!

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Hope this helps

Bob C

[This message has been edited by bcrabtree (edited 23 November 2001).]

bcrabtree
Offline
Joined: Mar 7 1999

I thought I should put Paul's advice as a FAQ and have now done so.

It's at:
http://www.dvdoctor.net/cgi-bin/ubb/Forum3/HTML/000080.html

We'll try to ensure that this FAQ is maintained and added to as needs be.

Bob C