Voiceover

6 replies [Last post]
johnxl1s
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Joined: Feb 3 2003

hi

I need to do a v/o of around 1/2 min total , recorded one a few months ago for handiness sake on a sony 950e, ...wasn't great, sounded mono and tinny.
I have a few good mics ..rode ngt2, a seinnhiser 45 i think..! with a sk500 wireless adapter, also the seinnhiser 112 wireless lapel mics

main cam is a JVC 101e usually with the rode fitted.... i am thinking this would be best, any one any comments for best v/o.

edit software FCE/ on G4 mac.

its a favour but want to it right!

thanks
john

Claire
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Joined: Apr 28 2001

John,

Have you thought about using the voiceover feature in FCE?

quote from FCP4 advert:

Add a voiceover

Creating a documentary? You’ll achieve professional results easily by using the Voice Over tool to record your narration. Final Cut Express 4 lets you create quick scratch tracks or add a voiceover track as your video plays. Besides offering a countdown cue, the new Voice Over tool records “before start” and “after stop”, providing handles for your recorded audio.

I use the same feature in Edius and use it by plugging an inexpensive omni mic from Maplins into the computer via a little preamp (also from Maplins), sounds very good, better than the Rode which is too directional and sounds a bit odd indoors.

Claire

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

John

"sounded mono and tinny"

OK, that was the end result, but was it like that at the start of the process? Were you monitoring the sound before you recorded it? Good quality headphones are often the best and least expensive way to check sound quality.

Make a few test recordings using the mics that you have. Listen to them. Pick the best and analyse if it could be better by different mic placement, different gain settings, different voice technique, etc.

The very best equipment that you have for this job is your ears.

Ray

johnxl1s
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Joined: Feb 3 2003

ok thanks

never tryed the v/o tool claire.
ray , headphones are seinn's , i believe it was the sony onboard mic that was tinny etc

thinking of going for the rode on the jvc ..to tape, then dumping to the edit line!

john

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

Assuming that you can get the talent to the edit machine I'd go with claire's suggestion of using the VO tool.

I use it quite often and it's great. I have the output of the studio mixer connected to the back of an imac. I have an AKG 451 cardioid mic with a pop filter (mesh type) and had to fiddle with the levels a few times to sort it all out but it's fine.

You get a count down to mic live and it uses in and out points likein the old days with insert edits.

Fiddle around with all the mics in all the devices if you want but you'll find that the environment makes a big difference and proximity can be used to good effect

Steamage
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Joined: Nov 11 2003
DAVE M wrote:
Assuming that you can get the talent to the edit machine I'd go with claire's suggestion of using the VO tool.

I use it quite often and it's great. I have the output of the studio mixer connected to the back of an imac. I have an AKG 451 cardioid mic with a pop filter (mesh type) and had to fiddle with the levels a few times to sort it all out but it's fine.

You get a count down to mic live and it uses in and out points likein the old days with insert edits.

Fiddle around with all the mics in all the devices if you want but you'll find that the environment makes a big difference and proximity can be used to good effect

I agree that there are advantages to this method. However, the down-side may be the noise from the computer (especially low frequency hum through the floor from fans and disc drives) and the acoustics of the room with the computer in. Can you rig up a monitor and microphone in the next room or a wardrobe? I have found that when my "low noise" computer is working hard (e.g. part way through a take!), a second fan cuts in, increasing the background noise and, perhaps more significantly, changing it so that you become more aware of it. It was suggested to me that I wrap myself in a sleeping bag or quilt when doing a v/o, to cut out echoes and background noise. Actually, that's not quite as daft as it sounds!

Mark @ Steam Age Pictures - Steam trains on video in aid of railway preservation societies. Latest release: "Mainline 2012, LMS Locomotives", on DVD or Bluray Disc.

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

I'm blessed both with a quiet compter (Mac Pro or Imac) and a separate studio space so ambient machine noise isn't a problem.

A duvet over a clothes airer works well as a device to soften the acoustics of a room.

a mate has a cardboard box lined with felt so the talent looks like "nipper" from the old HMV logo but it seems to work ok