Why not " How to build your own video editing computer!"

37 replies [Last post]
KevBill
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Joined: Aug 10 2002

Would there be any mileage on building a system from scratch. Maybe a system for under a grand and one over 2 grand.

This could involve what to look for in whichever motherboard, raid ec. Which type of memory to use for best results.

How to install the graphics/video cards, also what type you need.

IRQ clashes and how to resove them. Basically a step by step guide for people out there that would like to have systems tailor made for their exact requirements.

Anyway, just a thought, so don't shoot me.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

Regards,

Kevin.

cstv
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Joined: Jul 26 2002

sounds like a great idea... Bob?

you could even spread it out into a series - to avoid being too brief on things like RAID and IRQs, and it should help to sell even more mags... everyones a winner!

alan wells
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Joined: Aug 13 2000

.....and while your about it, Bob, could you include an update on this board of the road works within 100 miles of Dover so that when we go over to France to collect the bits that we need (bound to be cheaper than in UK), we aren't held up in traffic.

Really, guys, get real! Why is everybody obsessed with price and then filling the pages of the webboards to remedy the shortcuts that they have taken to save 2 bob (sorry shillings).

and if CV started features such as these, would Siren and Red Sub and DVC et al still advertise?

Alan Wells

pcwells
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Joined: Jun 10 1999

quote:Originally posted by alan wells:
...and if CV started features such as these, would Siren and Red Sub and DVC et al still advertise?

Probably more so, considering that such features would show what a minefield the self-build route can be.

Pete

KevBill
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Joined: Aug 10 2002

NOW, NOW ALAN.

It was only a thought. Maye it would be asking too much.

Is it only a few pounds that we save, or maybe several hundred.

It might not be viable to do, then again it might.

I think t would be up to Bob and Co to decide, don't you?

BTW How many road works are there on the way to Dover?

Regards to all posters for the input.

Kevin.

alan wells
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Joined: Aug 13 2000

Kev,

Ok, I was a bit heavy on the irony, sorry!

For 30 or so years, I was in a selling environment in the computer industry where people assumed that cost and price were the same thing - the kind of people who know the cost of everything and the value of nothing!

Probably, magazines such as CV would not exist without its advertisers so it would be counter-productive to start a series on how to build your own editing system when all the advertisers are sellers of editing systems. Also, when the suggestions printed didn't work for you (the new systems builder), it comes back on the mag and a few new forums are formed.

I don't know your own background but another respondent to this thread is in IT - he has the technical knowledge to remedy the faults and problems that he might meet or induce by DIY-systems building.

When video editing becomes even more popular, it is only a matter of time before BBC shows a series "DIY - Build your own computer disasters".

Many years ago, I used the analogy in computer selling, "if the motor industry had advanced at the same rate as the computer industry, you could now buy a car for £100 and drive around the world on 2 litres of petrol". Computer building is not for the novice.

For a burst pipe, hire a plumber.
For a leaking radiator, contact the CORGI man.
For a video-editing system, don't DIY unless you know what you're about.

That's my thoughts.

Alan Wells

bcrabtree
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Joined: Mar 7 1999

There are so so many ready-built low-cost PCs available today, that I don't think this is something I'd want to give space to.

Contrary to what has been suggested, if I thought it were relevant, I'd include it irrespective of what advertisers thought.

Bob C

cstv
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Joined: Jul 26 2002

quote:Originally posted by bcrabtree:
There are so so many ready-built low-cost PCs available today, that I don't think this is something I'd want to give space to.

that said though, Bob, don't you find that "ready-built low-cost" systems are an ever increasing problem, often designed and built with cost in mind and little thought for performance.

with regards to Alan's point about "don't DIY unless you know what you're about", how do you expect people to know what they're about without giving it a go? and how can you expect anyone to give it a go without the support of other people with similar interests (such as CV and it's readers)? I would be greatly dissapointed in anyone who thought fit to blame a general tutorial in a magazine for a problem they had when building a PC. I can't imagine CV would print anything that was untrue and thus would have nothing to worry about.

Also Alan, when you mention people skimping on labour costs to save a few quid, i don't think this in necesarily the case - some people enjoy building things and see this as a good way to learn. I personally think that if more people were encouraged to get "under the bonnet" of their edit suite they might have a better understanding of how it's best used, in a similar way to cars.

However, at the end of the day everyone is entitled to their own opinion and it's Bob's mag - if he doesn't want to feature something he doesn't have to. Furthermore i can't recall any instance where CV has ever bowed to advertiser pressure.

mark.

btw, when you said that "another respondent to this thread is in IT" i assume you were talking about Pete rather than myself since i'm not technically an IT technician... although you'd be forgiven for thinking (along with some of my colleagues) that i was...

KevBill
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Joined: Aug 10 2002

Thanks Alan, Bob and Mark.

Alan I do see what you mean, I saw a full editing desktop computer for £499 inclusive of VAT.

It is just that it worries me that these systems maybe fine for getting you started, but what happens when you want to upgrade the things.

Regarding people blaming CV for anything going wrong, a disclaimer at the end of the article, should solve that problem.

My concerns about these systems are that
they might have a crap mobo and your choice of graphics and audio cards might be limied if your board is a cheap unsupported one.

If going the way you propose, which as I said I would go that route, is there a way we can be certain the internal mobo is upgradeable for a few years (3-5),at least?

Don't need to appologise, I'm glad it provoked a reaction and got a reply.

Bob,

OK, fair comment(s). Then, how about a round up of a few video editing machines.

I know you do review machines individually,
a head to head type competition, as they do in say PCPro.

WHOAA,WHOAA, before your head explodes and you tell me to go and buy PCPro then.

That is fine if you want a general computer,
but if you want a computer for a specific task, such as NLE. You and your team would be the best ones to do it, (you wouldn't ask Laurence Llwellyn-Bowen, if thats how you spell it, advice on Nuclear Physics or to recommend a good hairdresser or tailor, would you?).

The problem I see is that I know time and money is, like any business now, tight.

So if that is not possible, how about a head to head with machines just bought by the CV team.

Mark,

thanks for being on my side, there is, as you say another side of the coin. My way of thinking is that you can choose your own configuration, such as mobo, graphics and audio cards and editing software.

If you can do this with these turnkey systems, fair enough. I can see the advantage of these budget systems, but I would hate to think that if you bought one, 3 months later, you needed to buy another one to keep up with your needs.

Regards to all,

Kevin.

[This message has been edited by KevBill (edited 08 December 2002).]

Trevor Page
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Joined: Oct 4 1999

I understand, that any article attempting to explain how to build a video editing PC, could be like volunteering to become a minesweeper, with size nine boots and your fingers in your ears for tools. But if you think about it, an article detailing the build of such equipment is not such a bad idea. Particularly for those who wish to save money and have some idea of the specification they require. After all, most video capture cards are sold as after market add on devices.

In a lot of cases, those who have had a 'bad experience' trying to set up such a device start from a bad position. They might for example, go into their local store just to buy a PC. They are told, It has a 2.66Ghz Processor, 256Mb Ram, 80Gb Hard Drive, DVD ROM and CD Re-writer, all for £799 or whatever. After a few months playing around, they discover that with an add-on card they could 'edit' video on their PC. So they go back to the store and are confronted by an array of various capture devices. A salesman says 'sure it will work' so home they go with their new toy.

What a place to start eh? They don't know what motherboard is in their PC. SDR,DDR or rambus memory? PSU rating? They've never updated a device driver in their life. Two hard drives? After many trips back to the store with their PC, they are left with a bad taste in their mouth and never have quite the same relationship with that beige box under the desk at home again. Some are fortunate enough to discover this forum, some might even have spent a wedge from their retirement fund to buy the latest RT editing card based on a review in CV!

Now if you were to take a slightly different approach, 'The video editng PC that Jack built' for example, Could there be scope for such an article or series of articles?

Take one card, don't matter which, say RT.X100 for example, read the website for compatibility. Choose motherboard based on this. Choose Processor type, graphics card, HD, memory etc etc and explain in detail the reasons for each choice. Then explain in detail hoew to put the whole lot together, the common mistakes to avoid such as: where to put the MOBO mounting pillars. Avoid overtightening the screws particularly in PCI cards (very common) Jumpering of master/slave IDE devices. You get the picture. Software installation, driver updates. Problems encountered etc. etc.

To avoid upsetting the manufacturers, you could explain as is explained here, the reasons why someone might go to DVC or Red Sub or whoever for a dedicated system.

But IMO it is wrong to say to people. 'Here is the latest all singing all dancing card, this is how the install went in our test PC. (specs provided) Now go fit it in your existing PC or go to a specialist retailer and buy a pre-built system' There are a lot of capable people out there, who provided with the right info can make responsible decisions and successfully build their own video editing PC. As long as they are made aware of the pitfalls they could encounter along the way, I see no reason not to welcome such articles, indeed, properly researched and written they would be of immense benefit to many.

Trev

Trevor Page
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Joined: Oct 4 1999

Just to throw a spanner in the works, or rather, light the blue touch paper and stand well back I worked out how much it would cost me retail to buy all the components necessary to build an edition based dual Athlon NLE solution (including delivery & VAT). Component specification is the same as and in some cases (Monitor, mouse, modem) better than the list provided on a well known NLE specialists web site.

I must be in the wrong business is all I can say!

Their advertised cost = £2500 - £2600
My Cost = £1800

I don't think £700 - £800 can be regarded as a small saving, In fact I just built a nice little gaming PC for less than that!

Keitht
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Joined: Jan 8 2001

quote:Originally posted by KevBill:
is there a way we can be certain the internal mobo is upgradeable for a few years (3-5),at least?

If you bought a machine with the very latest mobo etc it might remain upgradeable for around 3 years but 5 would be highly unlikely. As an example I purchased a new machine in late 99 and by early 2002 couldn't get a compatible processor with a worthwhil increase in power. That was just over 2 years. The upside of that was that my new machine now does everything I need of it and should see me through a good few years. The software I use has all the features I require so as long as I resist the temptation to upgrade that because the new version has some 'useful' extras I will be OK.

[This message has been edited by KevBill (edited 08 December 2002).]

------------------
Regards

Keith

Regards Keith

andrewh
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Joined: Oct 4 1999

Trevor,

Could you publish your "Spec" in this thread. It would be very interesting for those wanting to learn. You could say why you made the choices etc.

For me, it would be very interesting to see how much more it would be to buy the components here in Belgium. Dabs and co will no longer ship abroad and typically it is much more expensive here.

Thanks
Andrew

alan wells
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Joined: Aug 13 2000

Trevor,

OK, you have now told us where you are coming from, a system builder.

>>>>In fact I just built a nice little gaming PC for less than that!<<<

Firstly, you don't need a dual-processor Athlon to run Edition. I have a 2.5ghz Pentium 4, 512mb DDR, 80gb disk, CD-rewriter, DVD ROM bought from PC World a few weeks ago, added my video drive from the old machine, bought Edition DV500 from Siren, sold the old machine all at a net spend of under £750.

Casual users don't need dual-processors to run Edition - whilst the software is rendering the latest change, you are thinking about the next edit decision.

Secondly, not everyone is a system-builder IT expert.

Finally, I think it irresponsible to make a case for the case that cannot, in all conscience, be made - leave systems-building to the experts.

Alan Wells

KevBill
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Joined: Aug 10 2002

Keith,

thanks a lot.

Alan,

you bought your machine from PC world. It seems that there are a few complaints about them. Is this a good way to go?

I was thinking of getting a decent machine from them and then buying a canopus AVC100 or Dazzle Hollywood Bridge for my analogue footage.

I want to run Sonic Foundry software, also Cubase.

So I need a good sound card for the audio side of things, I like creating ny own musical soundtracks with audio and midi combined.

Also a good video card for the graphics.

So a trip to Comet or PC World will have to suffice.

Regards,

Kevin.

KevBill
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Joined: Aug 10 2002

OK, OK.

Why not do an issue where a computers innards are pictured and listed.

There was a similar thing with BT Broadband.

The computer was opened up, with all of it's contents listed. This gave a small discription of what each piece of hardware was and what you needed for each item.

This could include the motherboard. What type of ones to look out for and which ones to avoid.

Graphics cards, what types you need for editing to a reasonable to higher end level. Including whether a TV out is any use at all.

Audio cards, raid and capture devices etc.

Also any dangers to watch out for, especially with the conflicts you might be in for.

Am I waffling on the same old lines, maybe I am.

SORRY FOLKS.

Any other suggestions about what to be aware of when purchasing off the shelf Comet gear or video editing machines as lifes never perfect is it?

Regards,

Kevin.

Trevor Page
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Joined: Oct 4 1999

quote:Originally posted by alan wells:
Trevor,
Firstly, you don't need a dual-processor Athlon to run Edition. I have a 2.5ghz Pentium 4, 512mb DDR, 80gb disk, CD-rewriter, DVD ROM bought from PC World a few weeks ago, added my video drive from the old machine, bought Edition DV500 from Siren, sold the old machine all at a net spend of under £750.

I never said that you needed a dual processor Athlon to run Edition. What I did was take a random specification from a Turnkey system supplier and match that specification component for component with parts anyone could purchase in the UK over the web at Retail prices. Then I pointed out the difference in price!

quote:Originally posted by alan wells:

Secondly, not everyone is a system-builder IT expert.

That is the point. People who build systems need information, a screwdriver, experience and not much else.

When I first started with digital electronics back in the late seventies, PC's were unheard of. I did a four year apprenticeship and was involved in the repair of microprocessor controlled circuits to component level. A skilled job in those days. At the beginning of the 90's, it all changed. digital electronics became a throw away industry. People like me had to pack away our soldering irons and compete with monkeys. Building and to a certain extent repairing computers became and still is a 'monkey see monkey do' industry. I used to resent this, but now have a more mature attitude.

Kev and many others like him are, if you'll pardon the phrase, The monkeys. They have the screwdriver, and some of the knowledge. What they lack is the experience. What they want to do is make up for that lack of experience by 'learning' from those who already have it.

quote:Originally posted by alan wells:

Finally, I think it irresponsible to make a case for the case that cannot, in all conscience, be made - leave systems-building to the experts.

If you want to take your hat off to those people who can and do build systems, then that is your privelege. But to deny those people who aspire to improve their knowledge by the simple act of reading a sensible well constructed article in a magazine... I have to ask who is being irresponsible?

To Andrewh.
I'm sorry if I didn't make the point clearly enough. I never built the system in question, merely carried out a comparison to demonstrate the difference in price between a turnkey system and the same system self-built. There were a number of component choices which I personally would differ on, but that is another story.

Regards Trev

[This message has been edited by Trevor Page (edited 09 December 2002).]

alan wells
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Joined: Aug 13 2000

Trev,

Obviously, you have your opinion and I have mine, and ne'er the twain shall meet. Whilst I am building videos, you'll be building systems.

The only thing of interest that I learned from your reply, is, "How do you do italics in a reply?"

Alan Wells

Trevor Page
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Joined: Oct 4 1999

OT:
Alan,
Italics? well i looked at what is included in the text when you 'reply with quotes' (square brackets and B) that formats to bold so I replaced the B with an I (for italics) and it worked.

BTW When you come south and I go north, we'd probably be travelling on different roads. LOL

Trev

David Haynes
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Joined: Aug 17 2000

A year ago I was on the point of retiring an old P400 machine that had a dead motherboard. It had been running - just about - Premiere but I was interested in a new video editing software solution and figured I'd need a hi end machine to run it.

But by trawling through a messageboard or two and making a list of qualified components for the software, realised that my graphic card (matrox g400), system disk (60GB IBM), sound card (soundblaster something), chassis (full tower), monitors (dual iiyama), firewire card (a fairly new pyro), mouse and keyboard were fine. I just needed a new motherboard and RAM.

So I followed the advice of others who had been down this route and bought a mboard that had tested working with the edit software, some RAM and a new PSU - total cost about 200 quid (not inc edit software). Installed W2K and system worked fine and has for almost a year - no glitches or problems.

Installing a new motherboard is easy - instructions are in the box.

The original P450 system was bought as a turnkey from a well known UK supplier.

I am currently planning on buying two new turnkey systems in January - for work. I need full support for these machines that will be working flat-out and the knowledge that they will work out of the box - no risk of software/hardware incompatibility can be tolerated.

And this is what it boils down to...can you afford to have a system down for days/weeks if you do have problems while you try and resolve them?

As a final twist, when a friend told me about 18 months ago that he wanted an edit system at home I advised he go to Dell (who had a machine they specified for video editing) and Premiere (which is easy to learn) so he'd have a usable system and full support from Dell. He had nothing but trouble, it just never worked properly - sound failures, Windows config issues etc etc.

I have no idea about car engines though. So I go to a garage.

You pays your money etc...or not as the case may be.

tim.callaghan
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Joined: Apr 4 2001

Come on guys,

Building a PC is not an overly complicated task. Having the knowledge to build a rocket of a system for NLE is going to require more research, but not overly difficult. A guide in CV would be great, and personally what I would believe, to be a very sellable article.

Turnkey is great for professionals, who are concerned about old bullshit 90's buzzwords such as TCO and ROI, but what about the consumer who doesn't want to fork out for turnkey and guarantees. I would like to see a guide on how to stick it all together, and configure it best for NLE. This would be good for many categories of people, the newbie to NLE starting out, the upgrader, the guy who wants to learn more about PCs, and maybe turn a few who didn't even consider the benefits of doing it them selves.

I'm not a system builder by trade, but I could do it with my eyes shut. I need no such guide, but would still like to see it in CV, as its worthwhile to the community, if not practically, but the knowledge and awareness that it would give.

So those that may think it a wasted excercise, don't just think of yourselves, as I could easily do. Hundreds of CV readers would benefit from a guide, much like the other tutorials they have run, even if I did have hand in one of them.

Ultimately it lies with Mr Crabtree, and either way, his decision will be well respected, but there's no harm in trying to twist his arm, budget PCs akimbo or not.

Tim

PS - People like using this car analogy when it comes to PCs. I'll throw mine in. I've saved 1000's, yes 1000s, since I got my ass down to Halfords and got myself a Haynes manual. There are still somethings I need a mechanic for, but only when I need some kind of crazy tool for a particular job. The same things apply to our little beige boxes, its really easy when you know how - and that's where CV should step in

Trevor Page
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Joined: Oct 4 1999

That's our Tim! direct and to the point. Well thought out argument and I bet Bob's arm is feeling mighty sore

BTW anyone know where I can hire an engine hoist in the Canterbury area?

Trev

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi,

Tim could post an article on this board telling us all how to build an editing PC, that would be very helpful.

And of course, Bob could then publish the info next months CV, that would help pass the winter.

Jim Bird.

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

Another aspect of building your own editing computer is that you can go where the system builders won't go.

My 'ideal' computer is constantly evolving but here's the layout for Edit 3 and Edit 5.

Full tower (6 x 5.25 bays) filled with
4 caddy trays (drives C, D, E, F)
DVD ROM
Storm Bay

All hard disks are in caddies, so to avoid jumper swapping all hard disks are Masters with D and E driven from a Silicon Image PCI IDE board.

No modem
No network
No sound card (m/b AC97 good enough for monitoring and doesn't use an interrupt)

Serial mouse on Com1 to free IRQ12
Printer port disabled to free IRQ7
(another rule in these computers - no IRQ sharing)

Building your own editing computer is not just about choice of processor, motherboard, etc - it is about making a single-purpose computer.

Ray Liffen

[This message has been edited by RayL (edited 10 December 2002).]

chris thomas
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Joined: Apr 23 1999

Here's my opinion. I'm currently on my third own-built editing pc. There's no doubt in my mind that actually putting together a system is pretty easy, considering that most of the connections and wires are foolproof. Some care must be taken with plugging in cpus, and making sure that the fan is rated for the chip (just plonking on any old fan won't cut it), but apart from that it's very easy to spec out some decent speed hard disks, memory and graphics card for a motherboard, and bung it all in a case.

The main difficulty comes with partitioning hard disks, installing operating systems, and ensuring all the latest motherboard and i/o drivers are installed. I've recently upgraded most of the components in my edit computer, and then spent two weeks fiddling about and swearing loudly at an unstable system. Eventually I tracked the problem down to installing older versions of the VIA 4in1 drivers - the new drivers did the trick, and now I'm up and running again.

Essentially, you can save money, and get the absolute perfect machine if you spec and build it yourself, but you pay in terms of time and effort. In a year or so, I very likely won't be building my next edit computer myself. Prices are now far more reasonable for a top rate, high speed, pre built system, plus I'll get a guarantee on the whole thing, and I won't have to spend valuable time and effort trying to get the bugger to work! I'll just plug in the extra bits (capture card, and extra hard disks), easily install some drivers, and I should be away.

However, you can go the whole hog and purchase a turnkey edit system. With this option, you will be paying more, but this is the only downside. The builder will have taken a lot of time and trouble to check that all the components will work together - it'll be a proven working system. You should get a cast iron guarantee (there's a possibilty that if I buy a pre built system, then install all my editing extras that it won't be covered under the original guarantee - check your small print!) and you will probably get some form of on-site maintenance contract.

I have a friend who is a field service engineer, and even HE took out the on-site maintenance contract for his latest PC because he knew that if things went wrong, he won't be paying through the nose for extra components - it's all covered in the service contract.

So, to summarise - Build it yourself, save money, but takes time and effort. Go half way, for half the heartache. Or, go the full hog for a reasonably more expensive, but trouble free solution.

Chris.
(I don't work for any system manufacturer or builder, but I've built my own systems, btw!)

Chris Thomas. http://cptv.co.uk - over 30 minutes of streaming video to bore yourself with!

Mikey_S
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Joined: Sep 29 2001

Im a bit confused here. surely this forum is mainly for people who want to build their own system. If everyone bought ready made systems for editing (that supposedly dont go wrong) then there would be no problems and no need for this forum. and yet this forum is full of questions about things going wrong. it seems to me that just cos u buy a purpose built turnkey system, that is no guarantee that it isnt gonna be a major headache, so what is so wrong about trying to build your own?

Mike

KevBill
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Joined: Aug 10 2002

My, my. I don't visit for a day and the replies go through the roof.

Hey Trevor, who you calling a monkey

Joking apart. I do think, even an article just outlining what to look for in the hardware included in off the shelf PC's could help. Or what to look for when upgrading your system may help.

Anyway with all these replies it seems to stir up some trouble.

Thanks for all the postings.

The monkey is signing off for the moment.

Kevin.

cstv
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Joined: Jul 26 2002

To be fair Mikey, the forum isn't just for fixing problems with systems. While that is one of it's major functions, it's also very useful for questions about software, and how to do certain things with it. Ultimately, like the rest of the internet, it's purpose should be as an information exchange.

quote:Originally posted by Mikey_S:
Im a bit confused here. surely this forum is mainly for people who want to build their own system. If everyone bought ready made systems for editing (that supposedly dont go wrong) then there would be no problems and no need for this forum. and yet this forum is full of questions about things going wrong. it seems to me that just cos u buy a purpose built turnkey system, that is no guarantee that it isnt gonna be a major headache, so what is so wrong about trying to build your own?

Mike

HallmarkProductions
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Joined: Aug 29 1999

re Alan Wells "For a burst pipe, hire a plumber.
For a leaking radiator, contact the CORGI man.
For a video-editing system, don't DIY unless you know what you're about.

That's my thoughts"

How about - for producing a video hire a professional? Or is your advice only selective? Where do you draw the line? Although i am full-time involved in the production of videos, I recognise that there will always be people who want to do their own thing, so why bother to discourage it? The forum here is full of people (me included) who ask questions they do not know answers to, that is the very purpose. Why is it so wrong to ask questions about building a system? Sometimes, a good way of learning is through making mistakes too. The magazine is called "COMPUTER VIDEO", so building a system is of direct relevance, in that it is linking computers with video!. Is such an article any less relevant than the series on how to set up Win2k for editing ? (which was run fairly recently, and was of great use)

I also feel that it is unfair to critcise people for wanting to save money. It does not always mean that they appreciate the "value of nothing". The potential savings on self-build can be worthwhile, providing one is aware of pitfalls, and the knowledge gained can be invaluable for years to come.

In summary, there is a place for everyone..live and let live!

Chris
Time for a new signature now...

CMBmovies
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Joined: Aug 4 2001

Hi, just thought id add my 2 peneth.

i often browse this forum for hints and advice, And i think an article on diy, would be useful.

Ive learnt through trail and error, much time on the internet and advice from friends. And over the past few years have gone from my trusty pentium2 300 and rainbow runner, to a p3 800 with rt2500 to my latest and greatest home built effort, p4 3gig with rtx100 420gig and 3x flatscreens.

and even building that i was confronted with trying to figure out how to put it all together, (i started trying to peel the thermal coating of the p4 thinking it was a sticker.... ooops)

i know you cant go into a great amount of detail in the space you have, that would be a whole magazine in its self. but just touching on a few of the main issues, showing people whats possible might spark peoples imaginations. And dont forget the disclaimer at the end saying if at all worried get a turnkey system from red submarine or where ever.

Richard Payne
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

As a system builder I thought I better add to the debate.

I don't think a DIY section is a good idea because of the possible dangers involved for non experienced personel.

Intel don't want it widely known that the insides of PC's are poisonous to all except ardent fans of science fiction and building your own edit system can wipe 10 - 15 years off your life.

Most of our brave technicians die before they reach 30 and David Clarke is now on his 3rd regeneration, all ginger.

Several people have been killed by the dust inside a medium tower and it is a well known fact that Atlantis was destroyed by a video buff trying to install a Miro DC20.

So by all means build your own, but do be aware you could destroy the world, die early and possibly start liking science fiction a little too much.

You have been warned

------------------
DVC

archy
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Joined: Dec 13 2002

this was my first visit to the forums been reading the mag on and off so i thought id try here

wow

the 1 thing that ppl looking at getting into video production is that there is lots of acronims (what do they all mean)

i've built about 12 systems for games and the likes in the last year and looked at getting a video editing system running

i looked at doing it cheaplly with a tv capture card and then transferring the avi's into premier

i learned a little at college last year thanks to the technician (good old gary)

but looking at building a full editing system i just get lost at what half the card compatibilities are

im not an expert im just a guy that at 37 wants to try getting into v/p

thanks for all the help i got from this one topic even though i just spent 45 mins reading it all (c being 37 slows ppl down)

archy

oops i spilt it again (the blood of knigs)

Roy Bastiman
Offline
Joined: Dec 15 2002

DIY is not for the faint hearted. The many variables in terms of Mobo, Processor etc. need to be quantified against the price you are prepared to pay. Advice in this area would be welcome based on tested items, and I think CV could help in this by expanding on the test results and recomendations published by edit software manufacturers.
The very fact that this information was being published would also concentrate the minds of those in the 'ready built system' business, to ensure the best kit is provided within their unit and hopefully reduce the hype and rip-off Britain pricing.
Any move exposing cosy fixed price operations which exist between manufacturers and dealers is to be applauded. Why should I pay the profit and wages of some 'brown box merchant' where no added value is made. I say to all manufacturers, cut out the middle man and let us buy direct, probably via the Net at ex-works prices.
The old adage is correct, Information is power, lets have less of it hidden from us so that we can make or own informed choices and dump the advertising hype where we find it. No the current advertisers will not like it, but in the long run maybe more responsible advertisers will replace the hype merchants (do you really belive what the glossy - expensive- adverts claim?)showing products reasonably priced in comparison to the prices being charged in other countries, notably the USA.

alan wells
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Joined: Aug 13 2000

C'mon then, chaps, there's a fella needs a hand here!
http://www.dvdoctor.net/cgi-bin/ubb/Forum10/HTML/009232.html

harlequin
harlequin's picture
Offline
Joined: Aug 16 2000

quote:Originally posted by alan wells:
C'mon then, chaps, there's a fella needs a hand here!
http://www.dvdoctor.net/cgi-bin/ubb/Forum10/HTML/009232.html

attempt made oh lord and master

Gary MacKenzie

sepulce@hotmail.com ( an account only used for forum messages )

Thinkserver TS140 , 750ti Graphics card  & LG 27" uws led backlight , Edius 8

Humax Foxsat HD Pvr / Humax Fox T2 dvbt

alan wells
Offline
Joined: Aug 13 2000

Gary,

Actually, I was waiting to see how many "lobbyists" to this thread would respond to the problem on t'other.

You see, IMHO, when you hit a problem in self-build, it is very difficult to help thru' a webboard, or indeed in a magazine article - however, I have given up on trying to persuade members against self-build.

Alan Wells

PS Irony does not become you, Gary!

KevBill
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Joined: Aug 10 2002

Hi folks,

here is an interesting link to a previous thread in the FAQ section.

http://www.dvdoctor.net/cgi-bin/ubb/Forum3/HTML/000080.html

Regards,

Kevin.

[This message has been edited by KevBill (edited 23 December 2002).]

[This message has been edited by KevBill (edited 23 December 2002).]

elbow
Offline
Joined: Dec 21 2000

Thanks Alan for sending people in my direction - I just noticed at the bottom of this thread. The system is now up and running in a groovy kind of way and ready to ship down to my Dad. So I'm sorry to have to point out that web based forum support is just perfect for the kind of problem I was having. Building your own system really rocks - it gives a tremedous feeling of achievement and is not the mysticaly difficult task so many people on this thread seem to think.

------------------
Edit in Prem 6.5 on self build AMD Asus A7V133 Motherboard - Athlon 1.4Ghz Matrox Parhelia Graphics card with 2 x 19" Iiyama monitors and Panasonic TC M14C Pal Monitor, 1Gig RAM 40Gig System Drive, 4 x 80Gig Video drives (two stripped for speed -153Gigbytes) and 80Gig Maxtor Firewire Drive.
Pioneer AO3DVD Burner.
Sony DSR11 Deck.

Dual eyes and ears, single nose and one very large mouth.