1 Mic - 2 Cameras

12 replies [Last post]
Peter Stedman
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Joined: Oct 30 2000

Is there a quick - easy and cheap way of taking the signal from one mic. into two cameras?

SIFI
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Joined: Sep 16 2001

How close together would they be working?

SIFI

Simon

Peter Stedman
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Joined: Oct 30 2000

No more than 500 yds apart . . . . (I joke!)
Possibly 10ft (Is that about 3mtrs?) but could, if need be, be much closer. What have you in mind young man?

Eddie Edwardes
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Joined: Feb 10 2002

You could try a sound mixer!

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

You don't say whether you're using XLR or not, but I assume that you're using balanced XLR over such runs. Use decent cable and be aware of mobiles and any other interference inducing equipment.

What we do is use EMO Mic splitters (similar also made by Prefer & Canford))
They are a large die cast box with 4 x XLR's on them.

Mic. in
Mic. Direct
Mic. A
Mic. B

One channel allows Phantom to pass through.
Also with Earth lift
and
Phase reverse

We often do a two camera two mic shoot where we split both mics to both cameras. It's neat and less hassle than a pre-mix. The boxes alsoo work at line level.

One (less reliable) option is to use one radio mic and two receivers on the same frequency. We have a system and it does work but I wouldn't recomend it.

Boxes from
Canford
Composite
StudioSpares

Our boxes about £75 +vat (Composite)

Kramer do an unbalanced box for about £80
(1:4 Distribution)

Best of luck

[This message has been edited by DAVE M (edited 12 February 2002).]

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

Should have said that they're about 375 each + Vat.
The system won't let me edit for some reason

[This message has been edited by DAVE M (edited 12 February 2002).]

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

Kramer also do an unbalanced 1:4 mic distribution amp @£79.00 +

Peter Stedman
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Joined: Oct 30 2000

Thanks for taking the trouble with all the gen chaps. When I said cheap, I meant that anything over 37.5 pence would not be on. (I jest of course) The need is for most likely a small one off little job and we have decided on two mics. of the same make and specs. one into each camera. The £75/80 touch could not be justified, but thank again for all the info. Peter.

Eddie Edwardes
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Joined: Feb 10 2002

Peter, if you locate your nearest a/v hire company you should be able to hire something like a Soundcraft Spirit Folio Mixer for under £20 a day.

John Willett at Home
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Joined: Jun 29 2001

Peter,

Two options…..

1) Radiomicrophone – use a transmitter on the microphone and two receivers, one on each camera, both tuned to the same frequency.

2) Use a transformer microphone splitter to split the wired signal to both cameras (eg: EMO as Dave suggested)– a bit clumsy, this option as the microphone and cameras are all wired together.

John

Eddie Edwardes
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Joined: Feb 10 2002

What's everybody got against sound mixers?

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

The way that I read it, Peter wanted to feed two cams with one MIC signal.

Most audio mixers will feed only at line level. I read it that Peter can't accept line level.

Although the splitter box is more cumbersome, it doesn't tend to pick up the problems that even the best radio's do. We only use radio when we HAVE to move around. We tend to have a system where each camera has two mics fed to it, so there's a wide audio choice in post, and we don't have to sync one camera's audio to the other's picture.

To be honest, on a low budjet, two mics is justas good.

Peter Stedman
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Joined: Oct 30 2000

Thanks a lot for all your information. I will stick to the two mics.