16mm conversion to vhs or dvd etc

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Dynamo Digby
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Joined: Nov 14 2004

I am trying to take off over 4,000 feet of my fathers 16mm memories onto a Sony DCR-PC3E to put onto vhs or dvd etc.
My 1st attempt was using a 45 degree silver mirror as used in slide takeoffs,NO GOOD -macro type encoding - ie black/white/black image. 2nd projected onto screen at about 10ft with minidv to the right-no flicker on screen, camcorder going light,dark etc. cine projector has speed controller but this had little effect HELP PLEASE !!!!!!!

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

You need to project an image no more than A4 size. Have the projector truely perpendicular to the screen, clean the film, the gate, the lens. Have the camcorder slightly off axis, sending the signal down firewire to your pc's HD. The 16mm was most probably shot at 24fps, so you'll have to speed up the projector slightly (to 25fps) to avoid flicker on our 50Hz mains. You'll have to have (or switch over to) a two bladed shutter in the projector. Use manual white balance and manual exposure, and away you go.

tom.

ClaireTall
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Joined: Jan 28 2004

I covert 16mm to DVD quite regularly and have found the best way is the projection method. I have a B&H TQ3 which doesn't have variable speed but the transfer is flicker free. I use a Sony VX9000 or a DSR200 for the filming on full auto except focus, the results are exceptionally good. I've tried far better cameras on manual and the results are awful because old film tends to change colour with age so setting the white balance may only work for some of film.
Even 16fps can be transfered at 24fps and slowed down on the computer with perfect results.

I appreciate this is a domestic product and I always tell a prospective customer who wants something a bit better they ned to go to a company that has a professional telecine, can't say I can see the difference though.

Studio with green screen for hire near Gatwick Airport.
Kit hire facilities on site.
excelsiorstudios.co.uk

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

I'm very surprised to hear you say that using auto exposure in your video camera is successful Claire. I've found that this defeats all the fades in the original film and also tends to 'bounce' when the filmmaker has varied the overall exposure of the original film to add variety.

Colour correction in post (I use the Storm real-time variety) is a must I find, as well as adding a rectangular frame (outside of the TV masking) to lose the soft projector gate mask.

tom.