Arial filming ?

10 replies [Last post]
branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

Though I have filmed from helicopters before, there is always some reflections. I have an arial filming project coming up from a light aircraft - windows cannot be opened, nor the doors removed, is there much that can be done to reduce these reflections.

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ClaireTall
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Joined: Jan 28 2004

It's not the reflections that are the problem its the perspex that the windows are made of. Whatever you do you will get a misty look to your film and may be even distorted. A helicopter is always best, get the doors off, get the straps on and hang out the sidemaybe with a steadicam/glidecam.

Studio with green screen for hire near Gatwick Airport.
Kit hire facilities on site.
excelsiorstudios.co.uk

branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

Thanks Claire - I know the ideal solution, but as mentioned - windows cannot be opened nor the doors removed - anyone with other suggestions?

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dvcam
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Joined: Nov 25 2004

try this outfit.......you need to speak with Garry

Website: anglecam.com
Email: info@anglecam.com
Tel: 01275 545133
We specialise in the use of U.P.A's (Unmanned Piloted Aircraft) Helicopters (Rotary Wing) and Aeroplanes ( Fixed Wing) able to carry various imaging devices from DV-CAM or Mini DV super 16mm, 35 mm film and didital stills. A live link or a video asist is employed so as to allow greater control of the shoot.
dvcam.

branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

Cheers - I'll be in touch.

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DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

Is it possible to mount a lipstick camera (or larger) on the wing struts and monitor inside?

ClaireTall
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Joined: Jan 28 2004
branny wrote:
Thanks Claire - I know the ideal solution, but as mentioned - windows cannot be opened nor the doors removed - anyone with other suggestions?

Yes, depending on the size of your camera light aircraft have little circular vents that can rotated, you could ask have one taken out, it's certainly not ideal but I assume this a budget job and may be the only solution.

The model flying machine guys charge about £2k a day which is the equailavent of 4-5 hours in a Jet ranger.

Good luck and let us know how you get on.

Studio with green screen for hire near Gatwick Airport.
Kit hire facilities on site.
excelsiorstudios.co.uk

branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

I have had trial footage from a wheel strut mounted cam previous to this, but the footage wasn't ideal. The 'www.angle cam' that DVcam mentions charge £500 per day for the twin engined helicopter - this has multi axis coverage and would be the perfect solution.
There is no budget for this job, just a few trials and maybe 30 seconds footage will be used if I feel it's acceptable.

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dvcam
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Joined: Nov 25 2004

branny..........another one you might want to try is ROTORFLIGHT LTD they operate out of Bristol. Speak to Paul on 01275 818754.
rotorflight.co.uk
I did have a number for one of their pilots called Dave but can`t seem to put my hands on it.

Smithnc
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Joined: Oct 26 2002

I did go up in a small plane with the doors off last year! A photographer friend arranged it and because there would be a vacant seat I was offered the chance of joining him. It was in Alasaka for a flight over Denali, the pilot took the back door off a six seater (3 rows of two seats), he also took out the two seats beside the door. The photographer and I sat in the remaining 2 back seats, strapped in. The heater was on full blast, but it was still a pretty cold hour. I took some good footage on my DV camera, although I still managed to get bits of the door surround in occasionally.

Nick

Filmaker
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Joined: Jun 21 2005

Hi
You may like to consider filming from a pusher microlight. These have been used successfully for wildlife TV docs. The advantage is that the engine is at the back and the front windshield is very low. Two seater models are used for training and can be hired for experience flights, so should be available for hire for filming and will be much cheaper than a chopper or an unmanned drone. They are highly manouvreable and are brilliant at low altitude for those shots above open water. With two up the pilot can sit at the back and the camera operator in the front. Some models have no windscreen at all as most microlight aviators wear crash helmets with visors! Be aware though that they can be very cold, so you should wear an all in one ski suit with thermal underwear. Silk gloves are best as these keep you warm but allow you to work your camera. A neck sleeve similar to the ones bikers wear is a good idea too. If you are warm and snug you will capture great footage. You could search the web for the British Microlight Association and try and find an operator that way. Best of luck.
Filmaker