Colour graduation filters

5 replies [Last post]
branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

I have a project that I'd like to use colour filters while at the filming stage.
This will be a winter project that I'd like to give either a 'Warm right up' or 'realy cool' look.

Anyone any experience in bringing out these looks using graduated filters?
I don't want to trial and error the shots, due to time constraints, so any advice would be appreciated.

Do not follow, I may not lead. Do not lead . . . I may not follow.

foxvideo
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Joined: Sep 9 1999

I'd have to question the logic of using filters as described at the shooting stage these days. ND's yes, Sky grads - maybe, but 'Looks' type filters - no.

With original un-filtered footage you have the choice of look, try warm or cold with software, I'm not sure what's available for Premiere, FCP has several options - Magic Bullet, Nattress and several freebies.

If you really must go for camera filters you'll need quality filters and those don't come cheap.

Just my 2p's worth...

Dave Farrants Fox Video Editing

Chrome
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Joined: May 26 1999

Dave's right branny. However to get the best from filters you not only need good ones, but you also need a decent matte box which even when not used with filters should in many cases help to increase your colour saturation (as well as shielding from light sources and the Sun of course). There are some filters it is certainly best to use during production rather than post... some colour correction for example, neutral density filters and a polarizer; nothing can replicate this in post in a convincing way. I use a couple of correction filters, ND's and a polarizer, though not at the same time! :D

Bob Aldis
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Joined: Mar 7 2001

From my old pre-digital days with stills I would agree that most filters are suitable while shooting, but graduated filters are tricky enough on stills.

BobA

Bob Aldis

branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

Cheers Guys. I've read about, but never used these filters and Matte box, that's why users knowledge can save me heaps of time.
The look is mainly for skies. This time of year the sky is leaden and I want to bring some fire into the shot, top gear style.
I know a post edited filter can be applied and Tiffen currently have software for this, but which would be best for the purpose.

Do not follow, I may not lead. Do not lead . . . I may not follow.

Alan Roberts
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Joined: May 3 1999

One suggestion I'd make is for you to get hold of a copy of Tiffen Digital Filters (it's a software package). There's a stand-alone version, and it plugs in to Premier and Photo Shop and AE. It mimics every filter that Tiffen make (and that includes all of Wratten, because Tiffen make Wratten filters), so you can try the filters on stuff you've already shot to see if you'd have liked the effect anyway. many of the filters have tweaks so you can customise them (expoensive ion real filters, but if you create a filter you like, Tiffne will make a real one for you from that prescription).

Generally speaking, I'ma against using effects filters at the shooting stage, because it;s easy to m ake a mistake and not be able to put it right. Do it in software and you can tweak the filters to taste.

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