Condensing Time

6 replies [Last post]
itspman
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Joined: Aug 23 2001

Hi

I have a small request.

Iam currently working on my epic big family christmas video, in it I have three sequences of putting up christmas trees.

My problem is this:

I have speeded up the first one and put a nice fast paced christmas tune on it (looks excelent)

The second has been cut/faded with a relax jazz christmas tune (also looks good)

But what to do with the third, its 25 mins in durration, shot on a static cam and I need to condense it to about 2 mins tops - any thoughts. I want it to look different to the other two but also stylish.

Thanks in advance

Adrian

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

Cut it into several shorter timelines and run them concurrently as Picture-In-Picture. Vary the sizes of the PiPs according to importance/taste. Make a feature of it. That way, it becomes short enough not to be boring, and interesting enough for the casual viewer to want to see it again because you'll never see it all in one pass.

My 2 pen'orth. I did it this way on a holiday video and it worked a treat.

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi,

Well done Alan, that is exactly what I did with two scenes in a ploughing video I made.

The whole thing was brilliantly filmed, but it was just to slow and boring.

So I gave the video more impetuous, by having 4 pictures and strings running concurrently.

It was a breeze to do using Edition DV.

There's nothing like making your audience work for their pleasure.

Jim Bird.

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

Actually Jim, I went a lot further than that in my effort.

I punctuated it with an animated postcard. One side had writing ("yesterday we went to... and it rained" sort of stuff) that changed from scen to scene and I rotated it to show the picture side, that had a 3x3 grid of pictures running concurrently, all active. One of them zoomed out to fill the screen, then pulled back to be one of four. The card rotation involved 12 video tracks, each with filters and transitions (because each insert was edited from clips, not just one clip running), then colour correction filters, and a PIP and rotate filter on each track, running in sync to turn the whole thing over in one go. I did it all in EditDV without having to pre-render anything, all in one shot. I was really proud of that one, some day I'm going to do a 4x4 or 5x5 version, just because I can

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi,

Well done, good job.

I did rotate my strings in a clockwise direction one window at a time, just to make the game a little harder.

I used 7 to 10 second clips and I always cut the four tracks (in/out) at the same point/time on the timeline, so all the scenes changed together.

I will have another read of your post Allan and I'll see if there are any features I can incorporate into my video.

Adrian, I think you may have found one answer to your problem.

Thanks

Jim Bird.

itspman
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Joined: Aug 23 2001

Thanks Alan, Jim

I tried this last night and I have to say it looks rather classy.

I have split my 22 min clip into 9 sections.

I started the first one full screen as it has a title on it and after approx 20 seconds it zooms out to the top corner and reveals the the other eight playing behind it, this continues for another min and a half
when the final clip zooms from the bottom corner to fill the screen and give a nice close up of the fully dressed tree.

Ive yet to add a suitable audio track to it but even without sound it still looks inpressive.

May try the rotation game later that sounds devious and like it may enhance it further.

Thanks once again guys, I certianly would not of thought of doing this way before.

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

I made a point of not cutting the tracks together, and used a fair number of transitions, so that there was something going on in at least one track during each second, somewhere on the screen. The revolving postcard was just the punctuation, did it because I could

[This message has been edited by Alan Roberts at work (edited 08 January 2003).]