editing in Premiere 5.1/DV 500

15 replies [Last post]
tony bond
Offline
Joined: Aug 14 2000

Should be grateful if anyone has the answer to these questions please (1) part of my project has about 100 clips and I would like to apply the same transition throughout -is there a way of doing the lot at a stroke or must each transition be applied individually ? (2) how does one bring the Spice Rack plug-in transitions into a project? Any ideas would be much appreciated. Thanks.

ChrisG
Offline
Joined: Apr 10 1999

1. Am at work so can't check it out but can't you either rubber band/shick select or click on the left of the timeline (ie video1a).

2. If you go to gradient dissolve/custom you should get to spice rack transitions.

------------------

tony bond
Offline
Joined: Aug 14 2000

Thank you for your advice, ChrisG. Spice Rack now OK thanks, but didn't understand comments on point 1. I can probably work around this by just fading the audio in and out between each clip via rubber bands as the extreme volume jumps between the clips are the main problem area.

If you or anyone else can very kindly comment on another problem I have encountered in completing this wedding video, I should be most grateful: am trying to achieve the effect of freezing just the last frame of a video clip -i.e. full motion of happy couple walking down the aisle but, as they approach the camera, the picture needs to freeze on the last frame and stay on screen long enough for superimposed credits. Have played with Premiere's 'frame freeze' feature, but this just substitutes a still frame for the whole clip -i.e. it doesn't let me keep the clip in full motion then freezing the one frame as I would like to do. Have experimented by separating the last frame, making it a separate clip and then applying the freeze frame effect, but this produces nothing, presumably because 'frame hold' can only hold the frame for the same duration as the clip and, in the case of a single frame clip, the effect is practically invisible. Thought of grabbing the frame in question as a still .jpg and then stretching its duration in the timeline as long as necessary, but haven't found a way of doing this either. Would be most grateful if anyone can very kindly suggest a solution to this problem too please. Thanks again, ChrisG, for your help.

Tony

RayL
Offline
Joined: Mar 31 1999

Tony

Transitions - >is there a way of doing the lot at a stroke or must each transition be applied individually<

No, Yes.

Drag your chosen transition to the top of the transitions list and reduce the size of the Transitions window to just the size of the selected transition. You can now bring this little box up close to the timeline and drag and drop as necessary. There is a 'default transition' feature in Prem 5 but it is spoilt by needing a triple keypress.

Still frame - the laborious method (but it works) is to separate the last frame, Copy it, and Paste it back on the timeline. Now select both these frames, Copy them, and Paste them both back. Select all four, Copy them, etc, etc.

For the lucky owners of an AV Master, of course, there is the 'Capture as bitmap' feature in FastCap which does it with one click.

Ray Liffen

tony bond
Offline
Joined: Aug 14 2000

Thank you, Ray Liffen, for your helpful advices. Apologies for lateness in acknowledging same. In case it is of help to anyone else, I eventually found in Premiere a straightforward way of freezing and holding for any length of time any frame in a clip: Place pointer on the desired frame in the Timeline, then File>Export> Frame>Settings>OK. You can then import the frame into the Project in the usual way, extending its playing time as necessary. Looks very effective at the end of slomo clip(p. 328 of the user guide, which I had previously overlooked).Thank you, once again, Ray & Chris for assistance in helping me complete my wedding video project, as desired.

Tony

Gladders
Offline
Joined: Apr 28 1999

Tony, I often freeze frames. The method I use is to scrub the timeline until sure you are seeing the last frame, then pull down file, export, frame, save as bmp. You then re-import the bitmap to your project, pop it onto the timeline and stretch it to any length you like. You need to use the alt key to see it when scrubbing before it is rendered. You can even save stills of pre-rendered filtered or mixed video by scrubbing with the alt key. I hope this makes sense. Just shout if you need clarification.
Almost forgot, you will probably need to use the flicker removal on stills, as any slight movement between the fields in the frame show up, particularly when played on your television (not as obvious on the computer monitor).

Paul

[This message has been edited by Gladders (edited 05 September 2000).]

Paul

tony bond
Offline
Joined: Aug 14 2000

Thank you, Paul too, for the additional input. The particular wedding project I was working on is probably OK now, thanks to all who very kindly contributed. DV doctor is such an excellent forum to accelerate the learning process of beginners like me thanks to the generous input of more experienced NLE practitioners. In my next project, it would be helpful to include a rostrum camera effect and, whilst I have noted from others' contributions here that Premiere is good at this, I haven't yet sussed out how to do it as there is no specific reference to it in the users' handbook -i.e. ranging over close-up detail of a larger canvas, e.g. a map or an art-work. If anyone can help please, it would be most appreciated again. Thanks. Tony

tom hardwick
Offline
Joined: Apr 8 1999

Well Tony, you stirred up a few thoughts on this subject, and I hope Ray now sees the beauty and speed of Gladders' still frame method.

I'd suggest a very careful selection of the frame you want to hold as a still, as any subject or camera movement will spoil the picture even utilising the anti flicker technique.

I'd also say that as a still it'll be looked at more carefully than moving video, so it's well worth pulling the bitmap into Photoshop for some mild tweaking before re-exporting back to the timeline. A levels correction, an unshapr mask and colour correction can often help a still frame a lot, and is worth doing.

tom.

Alan Roberts at work
Offline
Joined: May 6 1999

Tom, as usual, spot on. We spend far more effort looking at a still than a moving sequence, simply because we can look around it without it going away. Getting good quality stills into a video programme is not trivial, and professional programme-makers often get around the problems by doing things with the still, like pan, zoom, rotate, rather than just putting it on screen static. That's normally called rostrum work, in which a video camera looks at it in a machine-controlled setup setup (remember Ken Morse?). NLE attempts this, Prem does it quite well, AE is better but harder to drive, EditDV is awful at it but miles ahead at most other things. No comment on AIST yet, only just loaded up a trial version yesterday, and it crashed.

------------------
alan@mugswellvillage.freeserve.co.uk. Delete village for a spam-free diet.

tony bond
Offline
Joined: Aug 14 2000

Thank you Alan Roberts and Tom Hardwick for the additional helpful input. Not quite clear still re. rostrum effect. If I have a still frame (of, say, a painting), how do I pan over it in a controlled way in Premiere to show different areas of the picture in more detail in close up ? Can this be achieved at the post production stage (via clip/motion?) or must I actually shoot the sequence with the camera ranging over the subject ab initio ? If anyone can clarify, please, it would be most appreciated. Thank you. Tony.

RayL
Offline
Joined: Mar 31 1999

>how do I pan over it in a controlled way in Premiere<

Try the Image Pan filter. The size and shape of the view can be controlled with pixel accuracy.

Ray Liffen

Alan Roberts at work
Offline
Joined: May 6 1999

Yes, the pan filter is the right way to do it. You can select any part (or all) of the image at any magnification and fly the selection about. You can make it enter the screen from one side and exit the other while changing size. All that sort of stuff, exactly what a physical rostrum camera can do.

------------------
alan@mugswellvillage.freeserve.co.uk. Delete village for a spam-free diet.

Gladders
Offline
Joined: Apr 28 1999

I would use the motion control as you have more control of keyframes, tilting etc. Unfortunately I haven't got Premiere on this PC and can't remember the exact sequence to access it. I'll have a look later, and give a better update.

Paul

Paul

Ric
Offline
Joined: Aug 22 2000

Rostrum effects...Motion...Try this out Tony,it might offer some ideas.
In Premier click File>Import>File and select your image file.Then from the project window drag and drop the file into the timeline.Extend this to the required length.

Now click Clip>Motion, here you`ll find the Motion settings window.Click on the Start point, then go to Zoom and set at about 200%.
Move the start point so that the Visable area (shaded box) sits in the top right hand corner of your image.Now click the Finish point and place it exactly over the Visable area box.

Press the Play button next to the preview window and you should see the camera shot zoom out from your image.Click OK if you like it and preview as normal.

The other effects like Rotate,Delay,and Distort I`ll let you discover yourself,these can really make it look professional.I`m new to Premier myself so I hope I have`nt confused you or made you suck to many eggs....cheers Ric

Gladders
Offline
Joined: Apr 28 1999

An alternative way of opening the motion window is to highlight the clip on the timeline, right click to open a menu, choose video, motion.

As well as the start and finish points, new keyframe points can be added to the window timeline.

Best way of find out what can be done is to play, but you can achieve rolling (maximum effect aceived by starting fully anticlockwise and finishing fully clockwise), zooming in and out, etc etc. Precise positions can be obtained by typing into the relevant boxes, or you can just use the arrows. I'm not exactly sure what sort of co-ordinate system is used for up, down, left right, it is not x-y co-ordinates as I would have prefered.

The play preview conveniently shows the total effect of all clips at that point on the timeline.

I've used this for titles with individually tumbling letters which all neatly slot into place at the end. The more you play, the more sophisticated are the effects that can be achieved. You might have guessed, I like it.

Paul

Paul

tony bond
Offline
Joined: Aug 14 2000

Thank you, Paul, Alan, Ray and Ric for the additional detail. Kind of everyone to help to this extent. Sorry I had initially overlooked the image>pan filter. All your tips should fascilitate my imminent new project, a holiday video for friends, which will benefit from the 'rostrum camera' effect in a couple of places. Thanks again.
Tony