Email Woes

7 replies [Last post]
Gavin Gration
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Joined: Jul 29 1999

I need to send photographs via email & a GSM phone with a filesize of aound 2.4MB (2,400,000Bytes) - They have to be this size because my customer won't accept highly compressed images !!

Outlook Express is intalled on my laptop, when I check the status "Bytes Sent" shows a lot more than the 2.4MB per picture.

Typically sending a 2.4MB file will take 3600 BYTES - but sometimes it's more than this.

Sending more than one photo increases the data proportionally, e.g. 2 Photos takes 7.2MB.

I know that error correction could be responsible for some data being repeated but it does seem excessive.

Does anyone know how to optimise Outlook (or an alternative) to help me minimise the data I send ?

The customer does not offer an option to FTP the photos.

harlequin
harlequin's picture
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

i know that when i receive a 1 kbyte file outlook states it is also 4k in brackets , it may just be outlook doing some weird calculation.

i believe it may be because the file is turned into uuencoded ( 7 bit ) ant therfore file size is increased. ( 8th bit used for parity)i.e file is sent as plain text not binary attachment.the file is converted to ascii characters to represent the data in the attachment. the receiving machine automatically changes it back to binary.

uuencode stems back to newsnet and simple email protocols.

in outlook go to:

tools > options > mail format > internet format

you will see the reference to uuencode in there.

in outlook express go to:

tools > options > send

mail sending format should be plain text , then click plain text settings and make sure it is mime.( not uuencode)

hope that helps
==============================

found the bit i needed

'Uuencoding typically expands file size by about 50%, but
it's a damn clever way of representing binary data with
ASCII characters. You'd expect an expansion, as you
have to represent a much larger character set...'

[This message has been edited by sepulcre (edited 02 March 2002).]

Gary MacKenzie

sepulce@hotmail.com ( an account only used for forum messages )

Thinkserver TS140 , 750ti Graphics card  & LG 27" uws led backlight , Edius 8

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Hawk
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Joined: Nov 5 2000

quote:Originally posted by Gavin Gration:
Does anyone know how to optimise Outlook (or an alternative) to help me minimise the data I send ?

You could zip the images, just tried it on 9mb bmp image, the size went down to 4.5mb.

It may also be the version of outlook I use Outlook 2002 and the typical increase in size for 4mb file is 4k, so I am a bit confused where you say.

quote:Originally posted by Gavin Gration:

Typically sending a 2.4MB file will take 3600 BYTES - but sometimes it's more than this.

Sending more than one photo increases the data proportionally, e.g. 2 Photos takes 7.2MB.

as 2.4mb + 3.6k (3 600 bytes) = 2.404mb x 2 = 4.808mb not 7.2mb (3.6k rounded upto 4k).

I think 3,600 bytes is a small price to pay for 2,400,000+ bytes of data.

all mbs etc. rounded down to hard drive manufacturers sizes

Mick

[This message has been edited by Hawk (edited 02 March 2002).]

Mick

harlequin
harlequin's picture
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

quote:
You could zip the images, just tried it on 9mb bmp image, the size went down to 4.5mb.
endquote:

agreed hawk , but if the files are being uuencoded they will increase by an average of 50% due to the encoding process.

so although the zip will be smaller/should be smaller than the original file , it may still lead to a larger uuencoded file.

Gary MacKenzie

sepulce@hotmail.com ( an account only used for forum messages )

Thinkserver TS140 , 750ti Graphics card  & LG 27" uws led backlight , Edius 8

Humax Foxsat HD Pvr / Humax Fox T2 dvbt

Hawk
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Joined: Nov 5 2000

Hi sepulcre,

1. I agree totally about "Uuencoding" , and this should be checked first.

2. Ziping the file will reduce the size, Uuencoding or not.

3. Gaving post is a bit unclear with regard to the file size increase:

quote:Originally posted by Gavin Gration:
Typically sending a 2.4MB file will take 3600 BYTES - but sometimes it's more than this.

as you see 3 600 bytes is only 3.6 kilobytes, or 0.0036 megabytes.

4. If we guess it should read 3.6 megabytes, then this would be a 50% increase, and Uuencode would be the likely culprit, as you say.

I did reply specifically to, (or an alternative) , which was highlighted in my post, as your bit on Uuencodeing was spot on. (Some times between platforms Unix/Mac etc.. Uuencodeing maybe the only way available).

Mick

[This message has been edited by Hawk (edited 03 March 2002).]

Mick

Gavin Gration
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Joined: Jul 29 1999

Thanks for the replies:-

Sorry the 3600 was indeed a typo - I did mean 3.6MB (I'd just got back a from photographing an unpleasant incident when I wrote that).

My customer won't accept anything but Jpeg images - plus Zipping Jpeg's isn't much good.

I checked in Outlook Express - it's set to plain text/mime.

Gavin

Steve Allen
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Joined: May 4 1999

Hi Gavin,

Your problem is due to the inefficiency of using IP ( Internet Protocol). Even though IP is the mainstay of the internet and email, it is sadly a protocol that is very top heavy with high overheads. I am afraid that there is little that you can do. Zipping jpegs shouldn't really work, as jpegs are already highly compressed. Maybe you could upgrade your mobile to GPRS or 3G when it comes :))It will not reduce the overheads it will just get your data to its destination quicker.

cheers

Steve Allen

Steve Allen
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Joined: May 4 1999

Hi Gavin,

Just a thought but couldn't you ftp your pictures to a server and email your customer a url pointing to the photos on that server ? It might help a bit.

cheers

Steve Allen