Fault - 'Disk I/O error Status-00001000' - and a fix

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RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

What follows concerns the fault I encountered when attempting to install an operating system, and the fix (though I can't explain why the fix was successful and a normal install wan't). The OS was Win 2K (XP/Vista without the nag screens) but the same method should be applicable to corporate versions of XP.

Hard disks die - as the collection in my junk pile will confirm. It got serious when first the main and then the backup C: drive on one of my edit computers died from mechanical failure before i could organise a clone. (One started clicking, the other went into that rhythmic mode that means it searches for data but never finds it).

I should mention at this point that my computers have C: drives in caddies that are specific to each box of hardware and separate data drives in caddies that travel between the computers, so a faulty C: drive does not mean losing any work in progress and each client is allocated their own data drive for the duration of the job.

The problem came when I tried to set up a C: drive from scratch. After the Win 2K CD had loaded it's initial files, up came this fault message

Disk I/O error Status-00001000

The same message came up when I tried another couple of disks, which seemed (maybe?) to suggest a faulty controller on the M/B. I tried using the Secondary controller output but it was just the same.

Googling produced pages of people with the same problem, but nobody with any solid answers.

In the end, the fix was to do what I do when I create a clone, but in this case I had to clone from the C: drive of another computer. I don't like doing this normally because the OS has to 'discover' all the 'new' hardware and sometimes it makes mistakes.

The method needs a separate computer into which both the drive to be cloned and the clone can be plugged (it's easier with caddies). The first step is to open Windows Explorer/View and set it so that all files (including Hidden and System files) can be seen. Then you Copy everything on the original and Paste it on to the (formatted) clone (except for the System Volume Information folder). No Ghost or other proprietory software needed - just Copy and Paste.

When the clone was booted up in the 'problem' computer I had to do some tweaks and offer it a few driver disks but ater an hour or so it was fully compatable with all the hardware and (being a clone) all the other software (W/S 2, Roxio, etc) were all ready to use.

I then cloned the clone (using another of the disks that I had tried earlier) and got back to my normal situation of having a main and backup OS for all my important computers.

The M/B controller has to be working, otherwise the clones wouldn't work, so the puzzle still remains - if the Controller is OK and the disks are OK why does a clone work but an install from scratch bring up an error message?

Ray Liffen

Mark M
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Joined: Nov 17 1999
RayL wrote:

SNI{ if the Controller is OK and the disks are OK why does a clone work but an install from scratch bring up an error message?

Ray Liffen

Were you trying to install the OS from a CD?

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harlequin
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What size of hard drive ?

Gary MacKenzie

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RayL
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Mark - yes, from a CD (a known good CD). What was the thinking behind your question?

Gary - a 20Gb, a 13Gb and a 2.5Gb (big enough to use for testing). The 20Gb was used for the successful clone and the 13Gb was cloned from it, so both disks are confirmed as OK.

When using a HD purely for an operating system it doesn't have to be large - 10Gb is plenty. I try and make all my business gear earn it's living so in the same way that I have 10-year old computers working as printer drivers, I find work as C: drives for my HDDs that date from the days when 20Gb was BIG.

Ray

Mark M
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RayL wrote:
Mark - yes, from a CD (a known good CD). What was the thinking behind your question?
Ray

That is was a problem reading from the CD, so maybe a problem with the CD drive, the drivers needed to read from CD, the cables to the CD Drive, the Master/Slave settings. Those were the kind of lines I was thinking along....

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RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

Mark

That particular tower has two DVD drives (one reader, one writer). They worked correctly before the 'Disk I/O' problem and they are working correctly now so it seems unlikely that they were temporarily (and only for a specific time) both faulty.

The real villain in this whole saga is (as usual) Microsoft, who generate error messages which are not self-explanatory and who do not supply a list of all error messages, together with an explanation of their cause and suggested fixes. It simply comes over as contempt for the customer - "Gone wrong , eh? What a shame"

Ray

harlequin
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RayL wrote:
The real villain in this whole saga is (as usual) Microsoft, who generate error messages which are not self-explanatory and who do not supply a list of all error messages, together with an explanation of their cause and suggested fixes. It simply comes over as contempt for the customer - "Gone wrong , eh? What a shame"

Ray

well you are working with win2k , which was superseded years ago , and never was blessed with user answers as most users were not people at home , but people in business or with IT backup.

however i never had problems cloning drives , i used partition magic or ghost , and made boot partition fat32.
that way you could boot to a command prompt and do thiongs from there easily.

For 99% of modern pc users even decent error messages and links to the fixes would be useless.
i get phoned with questions like

them : '' it says i've added new hardware , should i let it install drivers ''
answer : '' have you installed any new hardware ''
their answer : '' NO , only a scanner''

I have had 2 boards get snakey when drives were swapped , and in both cases a into the bios , scan for hard drives , save settings and reboot fixed it .... the o/s was given bad info from bios which incorrectly identified the drives , relying on previous info and not auto checking as it was supposed to.

having just checked google , there are numerous posts about that error message
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=Disk+I%2FO+error+Status-00001000&btnG=Google+Search&meta=

Gary MacKenzie

sepulce@hotmail.com ( an account only used for forum messages )

Thinkserver TS140 , 750ti Graphics card  & LG 27" uws led backlight , Edius 8

Humax Foxsat HD Pvr / Humax Fox T2 dvbt

RayL
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Hi Gary

Yes, agreed that there are lots of Google enties (and I went through several pages of them when the fault first appeared), but none of them seem to explain (a) what is happening when that error message appears (what does 00001000 signify, for example?), and (b) a logical way of tackling it e.g.. based on IF....THEN....ELSE or similar.

As to Win2K, well, XP and Vista are only Win2K laden with a bucket-load of power-hungry 'security' add-ons and a few updates . From a peek at a screen in my local Sainsburys I note that they are using Win2K for their computer system so it is still regarded as valid by national businesses. For a supposedly 'Professional' OS it is unfortunately lumbered with Microsoft's 'twee' and rather silly nomenclature, like 'My Computer', which date back to Win95 but in general Win2K is well-behaved - which is why this error message came as a surprise and why I felt it worthwhile to flag it and offer a fix.

Ray

Alan Roberts
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One of the big companies operating HDTV kit across Europe in OB trucks still uses Windows 3.1 to run their router control software. If it ain't broke.....

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Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.

RayL
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Ah, Win 3.1, the first Windows OS that made it worthwhile to buy a PC . . . . about 1992, I seem to remember. Windows 3.0 was pretty nasty but the changes in that .1 made all the difference. It was the same with Windows 98. The original barely improved on the much-heralded but badly-flawed Win 95, but Win98 Second Edition made the difference that allowed us to do 2 and 3 hour edits instead of just short titles sequences and the like.

Ray

Alan Roberts
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Indeed, I started my video editing on a Win98 (1st ed) 450MHz machine, using EditDV (after junking Premier 5). It worked like a charm, wonderful system. I changed from it only because I needed to move to laptops.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.