Prawns in Sherry - I think you're going to like it!

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bcrabtree
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Joined: Mar 7 1999

Prawn in Sherry!

This is called Crevettes au Xeres - according to my "Sainsbury Book of French Cooking" - by Caroline Ellwood, but the last time I was in France and tried to buy sherry to cook it, I simply couldn't find any.

My theory is that it's a British dish, copied by a French recipe-book-writer, and then nicked back by the good Ms Ellwood.

Ingredients

* 2oz (50g) of butter
* 1 clove of garlic (needs to be crushed)
* 1 medium onion (finely chopped)
* Quarter-pint (150ml) medium dry sherry
* Half-pint (300ml) double cream
* 1.5 lb (750g)cooked shell-on-prawns (North Sea) And you'll have to take the shells off, of course. And, please, DON'T take the easy way out and use frozen, peeled prawns; they're nowhere near as flavoursome. By the by, I've never bought shell-on-prawns by weight, so I buy £5 worth.

* You're supposed to garnish the finished dish with parsley and a single unpeeled prawn, but - to me - this seems like a major waste of a prawn and of time that would be better spent eating the food.

The method

Melt the butter in a frying pan; lob in the chopped onions and mashed up garlic, fry gently until softened but not brown.

Lob in a bit of salt (if using unsalted butter) and lots of pepper (we use black out of a grinder).

Whack in the Sherry (no sipping, please!), bring to the boil and keep it there until most of the liquid has boiled off (you'll know after a few goes whether you'd have been better off not boiling so much away, but I do think the flavour is better if you do simmer most of it off).

Whack in the cream, turn down the heat, and simmer until thickened (no need to stir it much).

When it's thick, lob in the cooked prawns (you did remember to peel them, didn't you?) and keep on the heat only long enough to bring the prawns up to the temperature of the sauce.

Serve immediately with:
(Sorry, I forgot to tell you about the other stuff!)

*Baked* potatoes
(my original posting said, boiled, but baked is far better)

Salad

Warm, fresh bread.

Oh, and have some bread ready in the kitchen so that you can give the frying pan a good wipe around and not waste any.

Though I've never used the sauce with anything else, the good DVdoctor, to whom I introduced the dish, tells me he's used it as an accompaniment to a variety of dishes he's served the guests staying on his boat in Alaska.

When you've tried it, please come back here with marks out of ten.

If it scores anything less than nine from anyone, I'll be mortified.

Enjoy!

Bob C

[This message has been edited by bcrabtree (edited 15 June 2001).]

Chirpy
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Joined: Sep 7 2000

Mmmmmmm......

Tastes like Chicken!!!

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tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

It's seabird flavour!

Chirpy
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Joined: Sep 7 2000

Do you get wafers with it?

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pcwells
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Joined: Jun 10 1999

I want a flake in mine please.

RVS
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Joined: Nov 4 2000

Oi!!! Pete what are you still doing here? I thought you had abandoned ship.

pcwells
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Joined: Jun 10 1999

quote:Originally posted by RVS:
Oi!!! Pete what are you still doing here? I thought you had abandoned ship.

Hijacked a liferaft is more like it.

If it were only CV editorial staff allowed to post on this board things would be very quiet indeed.

Pete

tim.callaghan
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Joined: Apr 4 2001

Bob,

Tried it tonight. Girlfriend give it 10/10, me 9/10. Tasted gorgeous, but was a bit rich to eat a lot of it. Certainly agree with put as much pepper in it, as it curbs the richness a little. None the less, absolutely fantastic and sure to impress the other halfs folks when they arrive next week.

Thank you very much.

Tim

bcrabtree
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Joined: Mar 7 1999

Tim,

Glad you both liked it. It really is a killer dish, and I've never server it to anyone who wasn't knocked out by it.

Bob C

bcrabtree
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Joined: Mar 7 1999

Guess what the kids are making for me today on Father's Day?

Bob C

PD
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Joined: Aug 6 1999

Shall we finish as you started?

Okay!?

How about: "Prawns in Sherry" then, "I think you're going to like it!"...

Cheers,

HEXUS.swankyDynamicSignature - Give it a click!

andrewh
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Joined: Oct 4 1999

Hmmm... will throw that together sometime soon. Might be better if you used raw uncooked prawns as you would get more flavour by the longer time you can leave them in the sauce as they cook. However, I suppose those are hard to find in blighty.

To answer your point about Frenchness of this dish, I reckon that it is an anglicised version of a French dish wich would cook the prawns in Cognac. You would probably use less cognac but also some "fond de crustaces" (Stock made from lobster, crab, prawn shells). And, of course, it would be a starter (or fish course).

BTW, you can find sherry everywhere in France and other fine gastronomic countries (Belgium for example!). It's mostly dry but you can find sweeter ones. In supermarkets usually with the mass of horrible aperitifs they sell.

Andrew
Another hobby is cooking