Quality control

9 replies [Last post]
CastleFilms
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Joined: Sep 23 2008

After reviewing the DVD, I'm curious if any of you get it right on the first burn before making copies? There's always a few glitches I'm unhappy about...I admit I have only one standard 19" monitor at present.

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

Are you saying that the DVD burning itself gives you glitches? If you really check through your timeline before the mpeg2 encode it should make 'perfect' DVDs that can be copied easily. That's how I do it; time checking is time well spent.

Mintyslippers
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Joined: Oct 2 2007

Lately its been right first time. Occasionally there is a shot where the sound isnt quite right once its on the telly or where you can see the difference in white balance but most glitches are ironed out on the timeline.

RayL
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Joined: Mar 31 1999

There are often little differences between the way that the remote works on a standalone DVD player and the way that the 'psuedo-remote' works on a mouse-operated computer DVD player. These differences show up, for example, in the sort of closely-packed text-only multiple chapter point pages that I need for the bigger concerts. Left-right and up-down navigation often involve critical spacing. 'First tune highlight' is another critical item, especially when the layout has been amended several times.

Very often a test DVD (to be thrown away afterwards) is the only sure way to ensure that the disk will be correct in the real world.

Ray

FX Films
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Joined: May 9 2007

This thread confused me - why should anything go wrong, or cause doubt, between timeline and TV? I double check everything as I'm editing, so that I'm always completely happy with the end result?

The only exception to this was a couple of years ago when I painstakingly spent a couple of days experimenting with interlaced mixed with progressive footage and maximising DVD output settings (yawn!) .... but even then, I just used a DVD-RW so that I wasn't wasting lots of DVD-R :)

CastleFilms
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Joined: Sep 23 2008

Maybe I'm not sharp enough. Editing from one monitor maybe? I've never tried 2 before. But by the time I review the DVD I always notice something that needs fixing.

Paul M
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Joined: May 23 2009

So how many of you dont actually sit in front of the TV and watch the DVD through when complete?

I too always have at least 1 or 2 tiny things that need changing that are often missed on the edit. And this is after going over everything twice by 2 of us.

FX Films
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Joined: May 9 2007

well if anything it shows you're a great pefectionist and want the best for your clients...but trust me, double/triple/quadruply(!) checking as you go along takes less time than re-doing it all later :)

branny
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Joined: Nov 6 2001

Like FX I am usually pretty thorough when editing. I edit in 2 hour sessions and always review the last edit session before starting the next section.
Snow blindness can occur so my partner has the final viewing of the complete timeline (not to enjoy - to fault find on continuity/visual/audio) When the man from Del Monte says yes - it's put to DVD. :)

Do not follow, I may not lead. Do not lead . . . I may not follow.

Mark M
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Joined: Nov 17 1999
Paul M wrote:
So how many of you dont actually sit in front of the TV and watch the DVD through when complete?.

I very seldom do this any more.

I will run the DVD in a DVD player outputting to a CRT display but all I check for are field issues (never a problem any more unless I'm working with odd footage from third parties) and that all the navigation works.

I insist that the client signs off the DVD before replication, and always tell them that it's their responsibility to check that they're happy with everything.

But watch the DVD all the way through? Almost never. If it's right on the timeline it's going to be right on the DVD, with the caveats I've given above.

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