Shallow DOF Large Sensor Cameras For Wildlife Video.

5 replies [Last post]
Ron Jackson
Ron Jackson's picture
Offline
Joined: Aug 23 2007
Such cameras and DSLRs and their offspring seem flavour (or flavor) of the year.
 
I'm interested in filming birds, and it is my understanding that this would be very difficult, birds can move about a lot of course, with one of these. Following focus a problem and no "crop factor" which a benefit (one of them) of three chip cams like the Sony EX3 with a "still" lens attached.
 
Interested in other's views about this. Presumably there could be similar difficulties using one of these cams for news and sport.
 
 
Ron

Ron Jackson

MAGLINK
Offline
Joined: Mar 8 2007
Re: Shallow DOF Large Sensor Cameras For Wildlife Video.
Yes there will be too much shallow DOF on long lenses making it nigh on impossible for focusing.
 
A lot of people use 1/3" chip cameras such as the Z7 etc as you can then put 300 and 400mm lenses on them with adaptors and the magnification factor gives you a very long focal length. Still hard to focus though but a lower cost way of getting wildlife shots.
 
The EX3 would also be a good choice as you can also get adaptors to put still lenses on it but I am not sure what the magnification factor will be.
 
I did this shot of the moon a few years ago and used a low cost nikon 70-300mm zoom on my Z7: 

Ron Jackson
Ron Jackson's picture
Offline
Joined: Aug 23 2007
Re: Shallow DOF Large Sensor Cameras For Wildlife Video.
Thanks Gary and nice moon shot. I use still lenses on my Canon XLH1  and get a 7.2x mag. factor. I have to use a monitor for focussing. XLH1 a bit long in the tooth these days even with a nanoFlash but no signs of Canon introducing an interchangeable lens version of the XF305, with all the chat being about large sensor kit.
 
This leaves the EX3 as an affordable (to an extent) more modern option. Mag. factor there (1/2 inch chips) is about 5x I understand so still very handy,
 
 
 
Ron

Ron Jackson

Alan Roberts
Alan Roberts's picture
Offline
Joined: May 3 1999
Re: Shallow DOF Large Sensor Cameras For Wildlife Video.
Professional wildlife TV has always been 16mm and then super16. So conversion to video was easy enough onto 2/3". Short DoF is appropriate at times. If you talk to any wildlife professional about this (I have done so many times, and have trained dozens) they will tell you that DoF is always used purposefully, shot-by-shot. They deliver what they want to deliver, not the extremes of what they can deliver.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.

MAGLINK
Offline
Joined: Mar 8 2007
Re: Shallow DOF Large Sensor Cameras For Wildlife Video.
I would have thought that the EX3 would be a good balance of cost with stills lenses and quality of recording, you could always put a nanoflash on it if you need more than the 35mbs.
 
I still use my nikon lenses with my HPX371 but do find that the mag factor on 1/3" can be too much at times although the older 24-120mm nikkor lens I have is a good range for most wildlife shooting at reasonable distance, the 70-300mm can be too much of a handful at times. 
infocus2
Offline
Joined: Mar 2 2012
Re: Shallow DOF Large Sensor Cameras For Wildlife Video.
Gary Nattrass wrote:
I would have thought that the EX3 would be a good balance of cost with stills lenses and quality of recording, you could always put a nanoflash on it if you need more than the 35mbs.
Fully agreed. A 2/3" camera may be a bit better overall, but the 1/2" chips of the EX3 are a better compromise than any 1/3" camera, whilst still being fairly affordable. And still giving a decent enough crop magnification when used with stills lenses.