Shoot the Moon

10 replies [Last post]
Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi,

Just shot the moon tonight (eclipse).

Jim Bird.

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

Just for interest, at what aperture and exposure, and with what film speed (if on film)? Or, equivalents on video. I'm interested because according to my sums earth illumination from a fully lit moon is 19 stops down on full illumination from the sun.

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

The moon is the same distance from the sun as our earth is (give or take a yard or two) and as Vangelis tells us they both exhibit an albido of 0,39 (was it?) then if it's f8 at 1/125th on earth so too will it be on the moon, or of the moon, which is the same thing.

tom.

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

Yes, Tom, I know the moon gets the same sunlight as we do, but I'm interested in two other things:

1 the light we get from the full moon, which my sums say is 19 stops down

2 the light the eclipsed moon gets from the earth by refaction

I assumed that Jim had taken a picture of the eclipsed moon, it's that light level that really interests me. I just didn't express myself quite correctly.

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi Chaps,

If you like, you can check out the required details on my web site.
www.haddo.btinternet.co.uk

Regards

Jim Bird.

Select "Shoot the Moon" from this page.

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

Thanks Jim. So f8 is about normal exposure, meaning that your camera is about 50-100ASA equivalent. The red images have no camera readout so I don't get the answer I'm looking for, but at f2.8 clearly the shade images are grossly underexposured. How did you get the red images? Come on, let's have the details

[This message has been edited by Alan Roberts at work (edited 11 January 2001).]

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi Alan,

The red images have no camera readout so I don't get the answer I'm looking for,

The secret of the red images. Ahhhhaa! Well then!

The greyish images were shot using the Canon XM-1, the red images were taken with a Panasonic NV-DX110 complete with the Panasonic telephoto conversion lens VW-LT4350 which I believe is a x5. I only push the camera zoom to approximately x4, as from experience, this produces the best quality pictures, before blurring takes over.

As for the other camera settings, they were all manually set to Manual Focus, 0dB, 1/50. The all important f setting was adjusted with my eye on the LCD display and tweaked occasionally to find the optimum setting as the light intensity altered throughout the evening.

I cannot with any degree of certainty, tell you what those setting were at any particular instant.

The camera settings read out, which you saw within the XM-1 pictures, unfortunately does not apply to the DX100.

The orange/red moon on the night, was just a little brighter in reality,
than you saw in my pictures, but overall I am happy with my results and the performance of both the cameras.

Hope this sheds some light on the subject.

Jim Bird.

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Oh,

And the white balance was set to sunlight.

Cheers

Jim Bird.

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

Thanks Jim. I had a feeling that we were looking at 2 cameras. Thanks for the info anyway, and for the nice shots.

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Bill S
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Joined: Aug 14 2000

quote:Originally posted by Jim Bird:
DX110 complete with the Panasonic telephoto conversion lens VW-LT4350 which I believe is a x5

Jim,
Where is this lens available from? Have seen the 4314 but not a x5 for the DX110.

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi,

I purchased the lens from Hi-Way Camcorder Centre. Tel 0800 980 1955. I bought about 3 years ago and used it with my DX1, but I had to use an adapter ring to make fit.

Luckily, when I purchased the DX100, it just fitted directly without the ring and the optical coupling, between the camera and the lens was just perfect.

It produces good pictures and of course, it helps when using these big lenses, if the light is good and you MUST use a Tripod.

Best regards

Jim Bird.