Shooting against a window

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boobahack
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Joined: Jul 3 2007

Not sure if this is the right place for this, but here we go.

I need to shoot with the talent in front of a window.
I've seen a black mesh type thing which you place over the window or behind the talent allowing you to see what's in the background (ie. through the window) but without allowing to much light in.
A bit vague I know, but does anyone know what this mesh stuff is called or where to get something similar?

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

You can buy sheets of Neutral Density Filter (Lighting) and fix it over the windows so that the building is wearing a huge pair of shades.

I'd assume that there may be green house sort of stuff that's cheaper and might do although the colour rendition might be weird! You'd need to check

you can also do the same to balance daylight/tungsten interiors

try David Lawrence for the gells

http://www.studiolighting.co.uk/html/filters__gels.html

he's a nice bloke and a small outfit

boobahack
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Joined: Jul 3 2007

I was thinking about using gels, but I need about 10ft square which could get expensive.

I remember seeing this mesh stuff on an american lighting website a while ago.
It was on a frame about 20ft across that they just dropped behind the talent when shooting outdoors.

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

depends on your definition of expensive. £50?

I have a screen door added to a conservatory at home - it uses a black mesh/net clipped into a metal frame and from memory cost about £100 when I built it. It's predecessor was 4 bits of 2x1 and some old net curtain.

The problem with ND filter is the time it takes to rig/derig and storing it without huge creases.

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999
Dave R Smith
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Joined: May 10 2005

Hi Boobahack,

I had a similar problem last week with a shop front - though objective was more to avoid seeing reflections behind camera rather than see inside.
In this case - a rare sunny day despite forecast rain, the shop keeper lowered his canopy which did the trick.
Possibly you can darken the outside - using boards etc as shades etc - or a black sheet suspended on a wire to help reduce the contrast difference - as it seems you currently have more relection than refraction.
Could also try a polarizing filter, which more typically is used for glare on water, but works well on seeing into cars past tinted windscreens etc, so should work well and you can rotate them to adjust the planes of light you eliminate.
Or.. illuminate the interior some more?

P.S. Or possibly I have gone off at a completely irrelevant tangent to the requirement.