Singing hard drive

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Nigel Longman
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Joined: Apr 28 1999

Well not singing really - more like an intermittent 1kHz test-tone noise. I installed a new hard drive yesterday (Seagate 40GB Barracuda SATA II) and when I powered up the computer I heard what sounded like a 1kHz test-tone emanating from the machine. At first I thought it was a BIOS warning signal from the internal speaker. But investigation revealed it was coming from the new hard drive.

After a few moments it stopped but then started again and now it's making it intermittently although maybe it's not so frequently or loudly after a few hours' use.

Has anyone else experienced sounds like this, and if so what was the outcome? I thought it might be a tight bearing that might bed-in after a few hours' running. I'm in two minds whether to return this or not as the odds are as soon as it's run on test it will be as quiet as a church mouse.

Thanks, NL

Dave R Smith
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Joined: May 10 2005

Return it straight away - then the retailer knows it's a faulty component, rather than something that dies in users operation.
Also - if there aren't any technical reasons stopping you, why not go for a drive bigger than 40gb which is small these days, especially with video storage becoming more popular.

Nigel Longman
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Joined: Apr 28 1999
It's going back

You're dead right Dave - and that's what I'm doing right now. I'm just erasing the data on the drive using Acronis Disc Director - you never know where it might end up - before going for an invigorating walk in this chilly weather to my supplier.

The reason I use a small drive is that, rather than have a multiple boot computer, I swap the system drive using a SATA II caddy. This drive is used exclusively for Avid/Pinnacle Liquid which likes a clean XP installation all to itself so I'm led to believe, so 40GB is plenty big enough. I have some nice big drives in RAIDs for my video capture and storage.

Regards

Nigel

Nigel Longman
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Joined: Apr 28 1999
Exchanged for a new one

Well that was easy enough - suppliers agreed it was faulty and swapped it straight away. That's a relief.

NL

Dave R Smith
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Joined: May 10 2005
Nigel Longman wrote:
Well that was easy enough - suppliers agreed it was faulty and swapped it straight away. That's a relief.

NL

I know what you mean - retailer agreement means you don't have that persistant niggling thought that it's a problem waiting to re-occur.:eek:

Mad_mardy
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Joined: Oct 19 2000
Nigel Longman wrote:

Has anyone else experienced sounds like this, and if so what was the outcome? I thought it might be a tight bearing that might bed-in after a few hours' running. I'm in two minds whether to return this or not as the odds are as soon as it's run on test it will be as quiet as a church mouse.

Thanks, NL

Yep i had this on, ironically a seagate drive that was only six months old
died a couple of weeeks later, now i do not buy seagate i have seen a good few of these go

System 1: AMD X6 2.8, M4A79 Deluxe, 4GB DDR2, ATI HD4870 1GB DDR 3, 2TB total drive space, Matrox RTX 2, Premiere Pro CS4

System 2: AMD X2 5600, M2NPV-VM, 2GB DDR2, Geforce 8600GT 256 DDR 3, 450GB Total drive space, RTX100 with Premiere Pro 2

Camera's: JVC HD200, JVC HD101, 2X Sony HC62

Nigel Longman
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Joined: Apr 28 1999
My replacement was duff too

Interestingly enough, although as stated above the suppliers replaced the drive, the replacement made exactly the same high-pitched oscillation noise. So it went straight back and was swapped for another make.

That one was OK, but it was a Maxtor drive. Maxtor are owned by Seagate as far as I know, but being of a different design there was no problem, and it's still running fine.

It's not until you loose your first hard drive that you realise the things are fallible. The one lesson I have learned from hard drive failures is the importance of data back-ups, which I now do on a regular basis.

Regards NL