Staying Power

6 replies [Last post]
red
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Joined: Oct 1 2000

I've been asked to produce over 700 photographs of footballers. All youth teams, and I will have to go out and physically shoot them on film.No problem with that.
Previously,when it has come to copies I have trotted back and forth from the local developers with whom I have a discount arrangement for the amount of business I give them.This is a time consuming,limiting and expensive business.I want to do the copies as prints from my Epsom 740 with titles such as name & position included.
Problem is am I justified in selling them as momentoes when I don't know if the printed copies will last as long as the film originals.I've heard lots of stories about colour fade,yellowing etc.Shall I stick to film,change to Lyson inks,or just carry on?

Pierluigi
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Joined: Aug 25 2000

All inkjet prints will fade over time, depending on how the prints are stored and where they are stored the fading will happen quickly or gradually over a period of time. If the prints are stored in protective sleeves and kept in a dark and dry place they should last several years without any appreciable fading occuring, but they will eventually start to fade I suspect that a print stored in this condition should last for about 4-5 years before any really noticeable fading occurs.

On the other hand if the print is put on display in a picture frame like any other photo and is subjected to either direct on in-direct sunlight then the print will fade much faster, typically 1-2 years before any noticeable fading occurs.

Epson have recently brought out new ink and paper technologies that they state will prevent fading for upto ten years, whether this is truw or not, only time will tell.

In summary, inkjet prints don't last very long compared to photographic prints, they were never designed to do so, even colour laser prints won't last as long.

A lot of film developers now take computer generated image files and output them to proper film paper, that means that you can still edit and add titles to your prints and output them to proper photographic paper.

Hope this helps

Lui

peter millard
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Joined: Oct 19 2000

Hi there.

All prints fade, but "real" photographic prints will fade a lot more slowly than most inkjet prints. Certainly, using standard Epson inksets & media on your 740, you would expect prints to begin to fade within a year or two, in normal viewing conditions.

Epson introduced some new printers/inks/media combinations earlier in the year which they claimed had near archival permanence, but they have been plagued with problems from rapid-fading of the cyan inks due to ozone exposure on the 1270/premium glossy combo.(turning the prints reddish-orange) to serious metamerism on the pigmented inks that the 200P archival printer uses (so the print colour changes when viewed under different lighting conditions.)

It's been a PR disaster for Epson, and though new inks and media are on the way I'd hold on before taking the plunge.

IMHO, the best site for information on virtually all "photo-quality" inkjet printers is http://www.wilhelm-research.com/ which includes information on Lysonic inks and media.

Hope this helps.

------------------
Peter Millard
petermillard.com

Peter Millard
www.petermillard.com

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

On the subject of permanance I've got many Cibachrome (colour prints made directly from slides) up on display. When the sun shines (will it ever again?) they're in direct sunlight daily, and have been for the last 19 years. As I have the original slides it's easy for me to verify that what I now say is true: that they have not faded one iota in that time.

The technology is out there, all we need to do is catch up with it.

tom.

peter millard
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Joined: Oct 19 2000

Hi again.

Good (US) article on the Epson problem in the current Byte.com webmag - http://www.byte.com/column/BYT20001030S0002

The Cibachrome process was designed to have long-life stability from the off (it replaces the silver in an image with a dye) but even then it's rated as good for approx. 20-25 years - keep an eye on them Tom, and keep us posted!

All best.
Peter Millard

Peter Millard
www.petermillard.com

John Farrar
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Joined: Sep 13 2000

For what its worth. Have you thought of using dye sublimation printers? Sony, Kodak, Canon and Panasonic make a range of these printers. I would think that their light-fastness is better than inkjets, and they are quicker but paper is more expensive. Still, if you are going to produce about 700 photographs and sell most of them you should recoup most of your outlay.
http://website.lineone.net/~john_farrar

red
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Joined: Oct 1 2000

I guess I'll have to stick to film for now,I cannot justify selling inkjet prints that may fade after a short while.
I can't upgrade to dye sub because the project is being commissioned through the local community centre and a lot of the profit is siphoned off for better causes than my back pocket.
What annoys me though is all the creativity and hardwork that goes into learning and setting up these programmes & prints is let down by the fact that the inks will not last the course! Judging by the websites Peter has posted this is a hot topic and I'm not the first in the queue to complain.Thanks to all for responses.
Red.