time lapse of sunset, city or clouds

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bluefoe
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Joined: Feb 12 2006

Hi,

Not sure if this is in the right section so sorry if it isnt.

Ive had a search on google and couldnt find anything that doesnt cost. Does anyone know of anywhere or have any videos of the sunset a city or clouds time lapsed? If your not quite sure what i mean search on google 'Time lapse of sunset' and theres a couple of sites with examples.

Thanks.

harlequin
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

quicker to do it yourself.
sunsets quickly , so a one hour tape should cover it at this time of year.

Gary MacKenzie

sepulce@hotmail.com ( an account only used for forum messages )

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blah45
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Joined: Apr 23 2006
harlequin wrote:
quicker to do it yourself.
sunsets quickly , so a one hour tape should cover it at this time of year.

how in the movies do they do the city with the cars and they show like a days worth?
they use like super tapes or something?

harlequin
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

you can either record the whole time at normal speed , and then alter speed when you edit.

or

record at a set number of frames per minute.

many camcorders have timelapse capability built in.

with hard-drive recorders , this is becoming easier.

Hollywood etc probably still use 35mm cameras with real film , though others round here will have more knowledge of that.

Gary MacKenzie

sepulce@hotmail.com ( an account only used for forum messages )

Thinkserver TS140 , 750ti Graphics card  & LG 27" uws led backlight , Edius 8

Humax Foxsat HD Pvr / Humax Fox T2 dvbt

Alan Roberts
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Joined: May 3 1999

Many of the shots you see these days don't use film or television cameras at all, they use electronic stills cameras. Probably a big Nikon. There are quite a few user-ready solutions that will fire the camera at regular intervals, and download the stills to a laptop. All that's needed is an NLE that will take the hundreds of big stills and compile a video time-line from them (most of them will do that, no sweat). The main issue is keeping the exposure constant, because even tiny changes in exposure (0.1 stop) are clearly visible as brightness flicker in the finished output.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.

HallmarkProductions
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Joined: Aug 29 1999

Some of you may remember that last year (just before Christmas) we started a 3-month timelapse project. After much research, we used an IP camera. The clients have been very pleased with the result, though it is not quite finished yet. Over that sort of period there are many exposure changes - the weather changes, the light level changes, etc - in my opinion, it just adds to the sense of time passing - I don't think it matters at all.

Chris

Chris
Time for a new signature now...

rbarry
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Joined: Mar 27 1999

I tend to agree that exposure differences may enhance the feeling of time passing quickly, but it depends on the subject matter. As I try to remember, I think your posting on this question last year was concerning a building project that had to be maintained remotely (from your location at least, was it in the USA?).
How did you get on, what was the final hardware decision and how much post processing have you had to use?
Rick.

HallmarkProductions
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Joined: Aug 29 1999
rbarry wrote:
I tend to agree that exposure differences may enhance the feeling of time passing quickly, but it depends on the subject matter. As I try to remember, I think your posting on this question last year was concerning a building project that had to be maintained remotely (from your location at least, was it in the USA?).
How did you get on, what was the final hardware decision and how much post processing have you had to use?
Rick.

Yes, you are correct about the building project being remote from us - about 2 hours away (not quite as far as USA on this occasion!). We decided to use a Mobotix camera in the end. We looked at Netcam, but were very disappointed with the results. We then looked at a Sony, which, with software, was around £1500. I felt that the Mobotix worked the best though - it was reliable, able to withstand the weather, and the tech support backup was excellent. The software was very comprehensive, and included in the price. The company is from Germany - and are a really nice bunch of guys to do business with.

We took an image every 10 mins for the 4 months or so, and uploaded them automatically to a remote server via an ADSL connection. We then downloaded them to our local network. We maintained regular reviews of the remote server, just to ensure that the images were still being sent - remember, it was a building site, so, power was switched off sometimes etc - the Mobotix always re-connected without problems after such events.

We are still working on post, and there has been some work done in Photoshop to alter levels, and the images have been stitched together in Avid Liquid 7.

Chris
Time for a new signature now...

rbarry
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Joined: Mar 27 1999

But to add to that, it looks like the camera system you chose can be programmed to define exposure zones in any position of the frame, and be changed and maintained remotely, very neat.
http://www.mobotix.com/technology