Vibration from Concert

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CJE
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Joined: Mar 6 2002

Hi Folks,

I've been involved in some filming at a concert lately and was disappointed to see that the bass sound was shaking my camera quite badly.

I'm using a Sony PD150 on a Manfrotto head. The legs are Dynatran and fairly heavy duty. The camera was used primarily for IMAG shots of the guest speaker so I didnt plan any anti-vibration measures for during the band performance. In order to keep the camera good and steady, I g-clamped it to the platform it was stood on. The platform was 6ft high, on steel scaffold legs and straight down onto the concrete arena floor. The bass bins sat on the concrete floor, some 100ft away. It was loud!

Are there any good ways to isolate the camera from this but still have it secure for panning etc?

Cheers
Corrie

CJE

harlequin
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Joined: Aug 16 2000

thick rubber mats under each foot
then , from centre line / upright of tripod ( where there may be a hook ) , hand a bag containing a heavy weight.

if that doesn't do it , it's shoulder mount or steadycam etc.

Gary MacKenzie

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mooblie
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Joined: Apr 27 2001

Maybe using the SteadyShot feature (even though the camera is actually on a tripod) might help.

We find it can help when the tripod is on a surface that moves - like a suspended wooden dancefloor.

As long as you're not trying lots of v.slow pans, the SteadyShot shouldn't interfere too much.

Martin - DVdoctor in moderation. Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

CJE
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Joined: Mar 6 2002

Thanks all.

I guess if the rubber's too hard then that wont solve the problem. Dont suppose there's an off-the-shelf supplier for such rubber is there? I would imagine that those rubber pads they use for kids play parks would be quite good.

Cheers
Corrie

CJE

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

When we built a recording studio for a mate, we used 1" thick neoprene to sit the walls on. That was from Hills Rubber - Reading.

Studiospares sell mats to isolate speakers from the floor.
http://www.studiospares.com/pd_461600_AURXMOPAD%204%20PADS%20PER%20SET%20CHARCOAL.htm

DVdoctor
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Joined: Apr 1 1999

The problem I think is likely to be the steel scaffold. I would guess that the entire assembly ws moving so just isolating the tripod will not make a difference, Infact since you clamped it to the platform, it suggests that it was the the camera to platform but rather the platform itself. We have used these types of scaffolds before and depending on the model they are not rock solid, mainly because the platform is not locked directly to the legs but usually sits on it, and the legs are typically connected with x braces, so while the whole assembly is safe it is not absolutely rigid. The other thing you might have run into is someone banging into the scaffold or leaning up against it and banging to the music etc. So even if you isolated the tripod from the platform I would bet that you would still get movement.

For that kind of height we have gone with a boom on a tripod and had it manned,, which of course may not be an option.

Sharyn

DAVE M
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Joined: May 17 1999

I did a televised gig with Big Country and the BBC many years ago.

The venue had a sprung floor and the director insisted on having a couple of cameras on scaff based rostra. All was fine in the sound checks but at the actual gig, 1000 punters sort of pogoed (?) and Gawd knows what the images were like! The crowd also managed to shift the scaff towers a little as the crush developed. Glad I wasn't up there.

When I do stuff on rostra I try to be on a different bit, I carry a DIY step up that decorators use as I'm a short ar*e. I can have a very hight tripod and still be at a workable height.
I used to use one set of rostra that fitted exactly under a steel framed table. That way I could almost tap dance on my bit but the camera was still stable.

That wouldn't sort out the whole building moving though.

H and M Video
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Joined: Jun 5 1999

"1000 punters sort of pogoed"

The trick is to get the cameras to move up and down at the same time as the punters!

Harry

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