Video in SNOW

11 replies [Last post]
LesWinn
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Joined: Sep 3 2002

We are told that snow is imminent. "Correct" exposure for Video seems more difficult to determine than 35mm. I would be interested to learn from the experts.

Les

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

your camera will tend to underexpose the snow, turning it into an 18% grey sludge. This is no fault of the camera, it's the way all light meters are callibrated. Shoot with manual exposure and open up the aperture so that the snow is white 'n' bright.

tom.

chris thomas
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Joined: Apr 23 1999

Slightly tongue in cheek statement: One would assume it would be easy to white balance in the afforementioned conditions...

Chris Thomas. http://cptv.co.uk - over 30 minutes of streaming video to bore yourself with!

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi,

TIP, next time you set the manual white balance, set it using a green card or the green grass.

Jim Bird.

Pete Naples
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Joined: Oct 25 2003

Indeed, cuz the snow aint really all that white! Made that mistake in the past.... Got a comment from the DoP watching on a monitor, something about colour balance and mars bars wrappers.........

Nigel Longman
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Joined: Apr 28 1999

quote:Originally posted by Jim Bird:
Hi,

TIP, next time you set the manual white balance, set it using a green card or the green grass.

Jim Bird.

I'm confused by this one. Wouldn't doing that give the picture a magenta colour cast?

What point am I missing? Is this tip applicable just in snow or all the time?

Thanks NL

Bob Aldis
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Joined: Mar 7 2001

I was also puzzled by the "grass" reference.
Could Jim have meant exposure rather than white balance

BobA

Bob Aldis

Jim Bird
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Joined: Sep 15 2000

Hi,

Am I correct in assuming that you do not have a camera which has manual white balance?

Jim Bird.

Nigel Longman
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Joined: Apr 28 1999

quote:Originally posted by Jim Bird:
Hi,

Am I correct in assuming that you do not have a camera which has manual white balance?

Jim Bird.

No Jim, you're not correct. I have a Sony VX9000 which does have manual white balance. So rather than just theorising about this I got the camera out, connected it to a monitor and took a manual white balance from a piece of green card. The resulting picture took on a very distinct magenta colour cast, as I expected it would.

So I'm still puzzled as to the reason for your suggestion to use this method.

Clarification would be greatly appreciated.

Regards NL

tom hardwick
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Joined: Apr 8 1999

I'm guessing here, but I suspect that Jim is getting 'manual white balance' and 'manual exposure' confused. You can indeed set your exposure by pointing the camcorder down and locking in the reading given by green grass, as this comes very close to the reading taken off a grey card in the same lighting conditions. I've used it myself many a time.

If Jim means something else, I apologise for butting in.

tom.

Nigel Longman
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Joined: Apr 28 1999

Hi Tom

I suspect you are right, but Bob Aldis has already suggested this a few posts above.

Anyway, I shall continue to use my usual methods for assessing both white balance and exposure - they don't usually involve either grass or green cards.

I hope Les Winn, the original poster, has not been confused by this all.

Regards NL

LesWinn
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Joined: Sep 3 2002

Confusing, yes, but I am watching the expert replies with interest. My camera is a Sony TRV20 so has Auto, Indoor, Outdoor and Hold to choose from.

Les