wide screen

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stoo
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Joined: May 28 2001

Last summer I made a film about bmxing and skateboarding
This film is going to be shown in a local cinema. It was shot and edited in 4:3 is it possible for me to convert this so it is projected in a wide screen format? If so can any one advise how I’m to do this?
thanks

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

You have a choice of options, depending somewhat on what you mean by wide-screen. Cinemas treat anything wider than 4:3 as wide-screen and accommodate them by opening the curtains further, so you need to find out in what shape the cinema will be showing the pictures. 16:9 is standard for tv and is very close to the 1.85 of "normal" cinema, but mopst can cope with 2.35:1 and even wider. So, first find out what they can do.

When you've done that, you need to decide whether you want to modify your piece or not, then off you go. Yopu have two main options:

1: Fill the wide-screen with your picture.
2: Fill as much as you can and do something different with the rest.

Option 1 is probably the least satisfactory because you have only 2 further options:

1a: Crop top/bottom so that you picture is the right shape (e.g. 1/6 off top and bottom gives you 16:9), then expand the remaioning lines vertically so that they fill the picture.
1b: Apply some form of image distortion so that your picture fills the screen but objects are the wrong shape. There's a form of "barrell" distortion that does that in some tv sets, it stretches the sides of the picture horizontally, it looks nasty but some people seem to like it.

Option 2 offers you some scope for imagination. If you don't want to crop your pictures, how about haveing them in 4:3 PIP boxes, but more than one on-screen at a time, overlapping or replacing each other but using the full screen area. You could have a backgriound of something relevant so that any part of the output picture that hasn't got a real picture on it doesn't just appear black. To do this, you'd have to squeeze each clip or sequence into a PIP that is 4:3 when shown on the wide-screen display, it'll look silly on your NLE but will be fine on the output.

Personally, this is the way I'd do it, because it offers the viewer far more excitement, and gives you a chance to show ioff what you can do.

Pretty well all NLEs should be able to do PIP and anamorphic squeeze like this.

stoo
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Joined: May 28 2001

Alen
Thanks for the reply
I will go to the cinima today and finds out if possible what equipment/screen size/ratio is.

Concerning option 1 I thort I could crop it. Ive got a storm 2 card and prem 6.5 wich has the option to edit in 16:9 but I thort I had to have filmed it in 16:9 first?
As for option 2
Can you give me more info on pip boxes? Or give me a clue on where to find out?
Thank you for the advice

Alan Roberts at work
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Joined: May 6 1999

OK. Let's assume your going to show 4:3 material on a 16:9 display.

By cropping, I mean that you have to nominate which 3/4 of the image height you'r going to use, because, to make your 4:3 image fill the wide-screen you can use only 3/4 of the height of your material, thats 576*3/4=432 lines. Typically, you'd crop (i.e mask) 72 lines from the top and 72 lines from the bottom. Than your image will lok wide0-screen in your NLE, but will only occupy 3/4 of the screen. Yopu then have to find a way to stretch those 432 lines back out to fill the 4:3 NLE screen, so that everything looks tall and thin. When you show this footage on a 16:9 display, the shapes will all look right, but you'll have lost image from the top and bottom of what you shot.

By PIP boxes I mean Picture-In-Picture. So your NLE project is fully 16:9, but you only ever put your clips on-screen in a box, so that it can stay 4:3 but not occupy the full width (or maybe height as well) of the screen. To do this, each clip has the be squeezed horizontally by 3/4, so that the 720 pixels squeeze down to 540 and don't fill the screen. You then find some trick in your NLE to put that image on-screen, maybe in a box with borders, whatever, and if you zoom it down a little it looks less silly. If you do this well, you can end up with several images on-screen at the same time, side-by side or overlapping, maybe showing different angles or different events, whatever. But, the big thing is that you end up with a 16:9 production using 4:3 images, and you've not neccessarily had to crop them (but you still can if you want).

I'm absolutely sure that Premiere 6.5 can do this, but can't advise you on exactly how to do it because I don't use Prem 6.5.

stoo
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Joined: May 28 2001

ok
Ill try a few things out in prem. I think Ill end up with the croping idea. the problem with the pip is that I want to fill the screen with the main image becuse it was shot for single screen not multi screen views.
thanks

bruise
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Joined: May 6 2004

i like alan's suggestion - particularly for something like a skate video

Alan Roberts
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Joined: May 3 1999

I've done it a few times when the mood takes me. It's time-consuming getting it to work because you have several time-lines going on, but you get some nice coincedences in the multiple tracks. the limits are in your head, not in the NLE.

Get my test cards document, and cards for 625, 525, 720 and 1080. Thanks to Gavin Gration for hosting them.
Camera settings documents are held by Daniel Browning and at the EBU
My book, 'Circles of Confusion' is available here.
Also EBU Tech.3335 tells how to test cameras, and R.118 tells how to use the results.